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Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.

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  • Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.

    Looking for additional revelation knowledge and understanding regarding God's relationship and perspective on Esau. We're all familiar with what Paul wrote in Romans 9:13 regarding Esau. An entire book could be written on Romans 9, no doubt. I would be interested in some edifying conversation regarding this passage. Also, there is a verse in Malachai 1 that caught my eye tonight...

    Malachi 1:3
    And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

    ??????????????

    Any thoughts or comments on either of these remarkable passages?

    Romans 9
    9 I say the truth in Christ, I lie not, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Ghost,

    2 That I have great heaviness and continual sorrow in my heart.
    3 For I could wish that myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my kinsmen according to the flesh:
    4 Who are Israelites; to whom pertaineth the adoption, and the glory, and the covenants, and the giving of the law, and the service of God, and the promises;
    5 Whose are the fathers, and of whom as concerning the flesh Christ came, who is over all, God blessed for ever. Amen.
    6 Not as though the word of God hath taken none effect. For they are not all Israel, which are of Israel:
    7 Neither, because they are the seed of Abraham, are they all children: but, In Isaac shall thy seed be called.
    8 That is, They which are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God: but the children of the promise are counted for the seed.
    9 For this is the word of promise, At this time will I come, and Sarah shall have a son.
    10 And not only this; but when Rebecca also had conceived by one, even by our father Isaac;
    11 (For the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth.
    12 It was said unto her, The elder shall serve the younger.
    13 As it is written, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.

    14 What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? God forbid.
    15 For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion.
    16 So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy.
    17 For the scripture saith unto Pharaoh, Even for this same purpose have I raised thee up, that I might shew my power in thee, and that my name might be declared throughout all the earth.
    18 Therefore hath he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth.
    19 Thou wilt say then unto me, Why doth he yet find fault? For who hath resisted his will?
    20 Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus?
    21 Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?
    22 What if God, willing to shew his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction:
    23 And that he might make known the riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory,
    24 Even us, whom he hath called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles?
    25 As he saith also in Osee, I will call them my people, which were not my people; and her beloved, which was not beloved.
    26 And it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, Ye are not my people; there shall they be called the children of the living God.
    27 Esaias also crieth concerning Israel, Though the number of the children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, a remnant shall be saved:
    28 For he will finish the work, and cut it short in righteousness: because a short work will the Lord make upon the earth.
    29 And as Esaias said before, Except the Lord of Sabaoth had left us a seed, we had been as Sodoma, and been made like unto Gomorrha.
    30 What shall we say then? That the Gentiles, which followed not after righteousness, have attained to righteousness, even the righteousness which is of faith.
    31 But Israel, which followed after the law of righteousness, hath not attained to the law of righteousness.
    32 Wherefore? Because they sought it not by faith, but as it were by the works of the law. For they stumbled at that stumblingstone;
    33 As it is written, Behold, I lay in Sion a stumblingstone and rock of offence: and whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.

  • #2
    Hi Blane,
    I think it looks pretty self explanatory as it's obvious how Esau lived and it was contrary to the prescribed lifestyle GOD commanded us to live. And Jacob, no matter how cowardly and weak he seems to have been; pleased GOD. I believe Jacob needed GOD more than his brother. Esau was strong and independent. He could hunt and fight and had a rebellious spirit. He married foreign women just to upset his parents.
    So we can see plainly what pleases our LORD. Not might or physical strength.
    What do you think? ..... Steve

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
      Hi Blane,
      I think it looks pretty self explanatory as it's obvious how Esau lived and it was contrary to the prescribed lifestyle GOD commanded us to live. And Jacob, no matter how cowardly and weak he seems to have been; pleased GOD. I believe Jacob needed GOD more than his brother. Esau was strong and independent. He could hunt and fight and had a rebellious spirit. He married foreign women just to upset his parents.
      So we can see plainly what pleases our LORD. Not might or physical strength.
      What do you think? ..... Steve
      Very good observations Steve......................Jacob continually humbled himself before God and asked for His help; Esau did not..........................Lou

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
        Hi Blane,
        I think it looks pretty self explanatory as it's obvious how Esau lived and it was contrary to the prescribed lifestyle GOD commanded us to live. And Jacob, no matter how cowardly and weak he seems to have been; pleased GOD. I believe Jacob needed GOD more than his brother. Esau was strong and independent. He could hunt and fight and had a rebellious spirit. He married foreign women just to upset his parents.
        So we can see plainly what pleases our LORD. Not might or physical strength.
        What do you think? ..... Steve
        Right. Agreed. But you're pointing to Esau's sin and Jacob's good works as the only standard of measuring why God hated one and loved the other. I guess what I'm asking may be more of a grace question. That is, how does Romans 9:16 (and dozens of other verses) fit into the equation?


        15 For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion.
        16 So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy.

        Blane

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Blane View Post
          Right. Agreed. But you're pointing to Esau's sin and Jacob's good works as the only standard of measuring why God hated one and loved the other. I guess what I'm asking may be more of a grace question. That is, how does Romans 9:16 (and dozens of other verses) fit into the equation?


          15 For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion.
          16 So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy.

          Blane
          I have never seen a answer to this mystery even once.

          On one hand we know that God is NOT unjust ( or unfair). God proved that He was totally just by requiring all sin to be paid for. God was so just that He shed His own blood for our sin rather than to forgive that sin without it being paid for.

          SO WE KNOW THAT GOD IS JUST

          But we also know that God is full of mercy and grace. There is no end to His grace. God will show more and more grace to anyone who asks for grace. He has an endless supply of grace. God proved this by having so much grace for us that He shed His own blood ( while He had not sinned) for us while we were still mocking His Name and did not even ask for His grace.

          SO WE KNOW THAT GOD IS FULL OF GRACE - not partly filled, but FULL.

          We also know that it is by grace and grace alone that anyone is forgiven and there is NOTHING that anyone can do to earn this grace.

          SO WE KNOW THAT NO ONE DOES ANYTHING TO EARN THIS GRACE

          We also know that one has to trust Jesus to save them to be saved. BUT we are told, and we have learned by experience, that even that faith to trust Jesus is a GIFT from God so no one can boast.

          While these things seem impossible to us to all be true, they are true. We are mere men and it is beyond our understanding, just as eternity is beyond our understanding.

          Everything we know has a beginning and an end. We can not understand anything that has no beginning and no end.

          We also can not understand how the grace to be saved is a gift from God, and God is totally just, and yet not everyone will be saved.

          We can discuss these things in more detail and answer questions about them, but I have never seen anyone who understood this subject.

          Everyone that I have ever seen try to do so, always calls God liar on one side or the other. Either their argument shows that God is not just, or that we earn our salvation. It seems to me that they would rather call God a liar than admit it was beyond their understanding.

          I accept totally that God is just. Jesus has PROVEN that to me.

          I also totally accept that I have done NOTHING to earn my salvation, absolutely ZERO. NADA, NOTHING, NOT ONE THING. The Holy Spirit has proven that point to me over and over again. I am sure that I have done nothing to earn God's favor.

          So I have to accept both facts as true, or deny the scriptures, call God a liar, and deny the experiences that His Holy Spirit has given me.

          I have been told that I have an IQ of 140 and that my math IQ is off the charts. I have been walking with The Lord Jesus for almost 40 years. ( I derived my own calculus to teach myself how to do stress analysis) I have about 40 different English translations of the Scriptures and sometimes spent 16 hours a day for months studying them. - BUT I HAVE ABSOLUTLY NO PROBLEM ADMITTING THAT THIS IS WAY BEYOND MY UNDERSTANDING.

          I hope you all can forgive my boasting to make this point. But I felt the point was worth the foolishness.

          Romans 11
          32 For God has bound all men over to disobedience so that he may have mercy on them all.
          Doxology
          33 Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable his judgments, and his paths beyond tracing out! 34 "Who has known the mind of the Lord? Or who has been his counselor?" 35 "Who has ever given to God, that God should repay him?" 36 For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be the glory forever! Amen.
          These things of God are beyond our understanding. But I am certainly open to anyone who wants to try to explain this to me, on the condition they do not make any part of the Holy Scriptures of no effect.

          But look at verse 32:

          32 For God has bound all men over to disobedience so that he may have mercy on them all.
          God knew that Adam would eat of the tree when he put Adam in the garden with it. That does not make God guilty of Adam's sin. God did not tempt Adam to eat of the tree, but instead told him not to eat of it or he would surely die.

          YET God put Adam and the tree in the same garden, KNOWING HE WOULD EAT OF THE TREE.

          WHY ?

          Grace to you
          Lou Newton

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, Blane, for posing this conundrum. Even if we don't get it all figured out I expect it will be an invigorating exercise.

            Great responses, Steve and Lou. You got me thinking.

            On the aspect of grace and love/hate with respect to Rom 9:15-16, a scholarly note would be worth mentioning. We westerners tend to apply a very strong meaning to the word "hate". It is a word of degree and engagement with words in kind: ignore, dislike, avoid, hate, put away, murder. I enjoy John Gill's commentary because he brings into consideration culture, word study, and the interpretations of men in or closer to the era. The Hebrew and Greek words for "hate" are often used to convey "neglect", as in favoring one and neglecting another. Here is Gill on Rom 9:13.

            We read the Lord will have mercy on whomever He wills, and the converse. But, to quote our beloved Lou, "WHY?"

            From one perspective it is enough to admit He is sovereign.

            From another angle it suggests that He is just. In Gen 27:41 we see Esau hated Jacob for receiving their father's inheritance, and determined to slay him. God loved Jacob. But was this cause for God to hate Esau? (Shades of Cain and Able, anyone? Isaac and Ishmael? Genesis 3:15?)

            This is a very curious thing I noticed some time ago. This form of sons, Elder versus the Younger.

            In Gen 32:38 we see God renames Jacob, no more Jacob, but Israel. Natural first, then spiritual. We know where this leads.

            But back to that big question: WHY?

            When Lucifer was created, he was perfect in all his ways.
            When we are born, we are imperfect in all our ways.

            One was hated by God, the other loved by God.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Baruch View Post
              Thanks, Blane, for posing this conundrum. Even if we don't get it all figured out I expect it will be an invigorating exercise.

              Great responses, Steve and Lou. You got me thinking.

              On the aspect of grace and love/hate with respect to Rom 9:15-16, a scholarly note would be worth mentioning. We westerners tend to apply a very strong meaning to the word "hate". It is a word of degree and engagement with words in kind: ignore, dislike, avoid, hate, put away, murder. I enjoy John Gill's commentary because he brings into consideration culture, word study, and the interpretations of men in or closer to the era. The Hebrew and Greek words for "hate" are often used to convey "neglect", as in favoring one and neglecting another. Here is Gill on Rom 9:13.

              We read the Lord will have mercy on whomever He wills, and the converse. But, to quote our beloved Lou, "WHY?"

              From one perspective it is enough to admit He is sovereign.

              From another angle it suggests that He is just. In Gen 27:41 we see Esau hated Jacob for receiving their father's inheritance, and determined to slay him. God loved Jacob. But was this cause for God to hate Esau? (Shades of Cain and Able, anyone? Isaac and Ishmael? Genesis 3:15?)

              This is a very curious thing I noticed some time ago. This form of sons, Elder versus the Younger.

              In Gen 32:38 we see God renames Jacob, no more Jacob, but Israel. Natural first, then spiritual. We know where this leads.

              But back to that big question: WHY?

              When Lucifer was created, he was perfect in all his ways.
              When we are born, we are imperfect in all our ways.

              One was hated by God, the other loved by God.
              Hi Barry, the part I highlighted in red, is a very good observation. But of course it still would make God's grace a result of their behavior. That of course is not grace.

              Lou

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Lou

                I have never seen a answer to this mystery even once.

                On one hand we know that God is NOT unjust ( or unfair). God proved that He was totally just by requiring all sin to be paid for. God was so just that He shed His own blood for our sin rather than to forgive that sin without it being paid for.

                SO WE KNOW THAT GOD IS JUST

                But we also know that God is full of mercy and grace. There is no end to His grace. God will show more and more grace to anyone who asks for grace. He has an endless supply of grace. God proved this by having so much grace for us that He shed His own blood ( while He had not sinned) for us while we were still mocking His Name and did not even ask for His grace.

                SO WE KNOW THAT GOD IS FULL OF GRACE - not partly filled, but FULL.

                We also know that it is by grace and grace alone that anyone is forgiven and there is NOTHING that anyone can do to earn this grace.

                SO WE KNOW THAT NO ONE DOES ANYTHING TO EARN THIS GRACE

                We also know that one has to trust Jesus to save them to be saved. BUT we are told, and we have learned by experience, that even that faith to trust Jesus is a GIFT from God so no one can boast.

                While these things seem impossible to us to all be true, they are true. We are mere men and it is beyond our understanding, just as eternity is beyond our understanding.

                Everything we know has a beginning and an end. We can not understand anything that has no beginning and no end.

                We also can not understand how the grace to be saved is a gift from God, and God is totally just, and yet not everyone will be saved.

                We can discuss these things in more detail and answer questions about them, but I have never seen anyone who understood this subject.

                Everyone that I have ever seen try to do so, always calls God liar on one side or the other. Either their argument shows that God is not just, or that we earn our salvation. It seems to me that they would rather call God a liar than admit it was beyond their understanding.

                I accept totally that God is just. Jesus has PROVEN that to me.

                I also totally accept that I have done NOTHING to earn my salvation, absolutely ZERO. NADA, NOTHING, NOT ONE THING. The Holy Spirit has proven that point to me over and over again. I am sure that I have done nothing to earn God's favor.

                So I have to accept both facts as true, or deny the scriptures, call God a liar, and deny the experiences that His Holy Spirit has given me.

                I have been told that I have an IQ of 140 and that my math IQ is off the charts. I have been walking with The Lord Jesus for almost 40 years. ( I derived my own calculus to teach myself how to do stress analysis) I have about 40 different English translations of the Scriptures and sometimes spent 16 hours a day for months studying them. - BUT I HAVE ABSOLUTLY NO PROBLEM ADMITTING THAT THIS IS WAY BEYOND MY UNDERSTANDING.

                I hope you all can forgive my boasting to make this point. But I felt the point was worth the foolishness.

                Romans 11
                32 For God has bound all men over to disobedience so that he may have mercy on them all.
                Doxology
                33 Oh, the depth of the riches of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable his judgments, and his paths beyond tracing out! 34 "Who has known the mind of the Lord? Or who has been his counselor?" 35 "Who has ever given to God, that God should repay him?" 36 For from him and through him and to him are all things. To him be the glory forever! Amen.





                These things of God are beyond our understanding. But I am certainly open to anyone who wants to try to explain this to me, on the condition they do not make any part of the Holy Scriptures of no effect.

                But look at verse 32:

                32 For God has bound all men over to disobedience so that he may have mercy on them all.





                God knew that Adam would eat of the tree when he put Adam in the garden with it. That does not make God guilty of Adam's sin. God did not tempt Adam to eat of the tree, but instead told him not to eat of it or he would surely die.

                YET God put Adam and the tree in the same garden, KNOWING HE WOULD EAT OF THE TREE.

                WHY ?

                Grace to you
                Lou Newton

                Now that's a pretty good answer to an extremely difficult puzzle, Lou. Thank you. I suppose if God's ways were not beyond tracing out, He wouldn't be God. Scripture does reveal that His ways are as high above our ways as the heavens are above the earth. In light of that perspective, your answer makes perfect sense to me.

                Blane

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post
                  Hi Barry, the part I highlighted in red, is a very good observation. But of course it still would make God's grace a result of their behavior. That of course is not grace.

                  Lou
                  Ah, sorry. I was not postulating it was truth, only how it appears from that perspective taking those things into account. It does not satisfy the question, in my opinion. I should have been more clear.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Blane View Post
                    Now that's a pretty good answer to an extremely difficult puzzle, Lou. Thank you. I suppose if God's ways were not beyond tracing out, He wouldn't be God. Scripture does reveal that His ways are as high above our ways as the heavens are above the earth. In light of that perspective, your answer makes perfect sense to me.

                    Blane
                    That is an excellent reference, Blane.

                    Isa 55:8 For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the LORD. 9 For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.

                    It's why He must reveal Himself to us. We know He is there, but not what He is like. And we cannot find out on our own, though we fancy we can.

                    Ever since you have known me via the forums, I have puzzled at the precise question Lou asks. God knew what would happen when He created Adam on earth and put him in the garden with the tree. God knew what would happen when He created Satan in Heaven and put him in charge of worshiping God.

                    Since He knew, then...

                    Why did He still do either of these things?

                    Why did He do both of these things?

                    Knowing He is God, it must have been done with perfect purpose.

                    (Oh yes. And I strongly suspect it has to do with the theme of enmity between the seed/sons in scripture. And if it's true, then obviously I can't in honesty take credit for figuring it out. )
                    Last edited by Baruch; November 5, 2014, 11:01 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another perspective on Malachai 1:3

                      Malachi 1:3
                      And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

                      Silly me. I couldn't make sense of this peculiar verse above. I was asking myself what the dragons of the wilderness (demons?) did to inspire God to lay Esau's mountains and heritage waste. But after considering the verse more closely, I don't feel that's what it implies. It seems to be saying that because God hated Esau, He laid his mountains and heritage waste FOR the dragons of the wilderness (to attack and destroy.) Not BECAUSE OF whatever the dragons of the wilderness did to incite God to act against Esau (which is nothing, I was simply misreading the verse.)

                      Blane

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Baruch View Post

                        Ever since you have known me via the forums, I have puzzled at the precise question Lou asks. God knew what would happen when He created Adam on earth and put him in the garden with the tree. God knew what would happen when He created Satan in Heaven and put him in charge of worshiping God.

                        Since He knew, then...

                        Why did He still do either of these things?

                        Why did He do both of these things?

                        Knowing He is God, it must have been done with perfect purpose.
                        My best guess is so God could reveal the mystery of grace to every creature in the heavens and the earth. If God hadn't allowed the free will of Adam to bring sin into the human race, grace wouldn't have ever been needed or revealed. Through grace came Calvary. Scripture says that even angels long to know more about the grace of God which has been hidden in past ages, but now is revealed in Christ Jesus.

                        Blane

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Baruch View Post
                          Ah, sorry. I was not postulating it was truth, only how it appears from that perspective taking those things into account. It does not satisfy the question, in my opinion. I should have been more clear.
                          Sorry I was not more clear. I agree with you and did not think that you thought it was an answer to the question Blane asked.

                          I agree that the behavior of Esau did not please God. Also his behavior does not make him likeable to me and probably many others. I find Jacob far more likeable.

                          Esau was arrogant and Jacob was humble.

                          Esau was talented and strong and this may have led to his arrogance.

                          Jacob's talent lay in the fact that he depended on God.

                          Lou

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Blane View Post
                            My best guess is so God could reveal the mystery of grace to every creature in the heavens and the earth. If God hadn't allowed the free will of Adam to bring sin into the human race, grace wouldn't have ever been needed or revealed. Through grace came Calvary. Scripture says that even angels long to know more about the grace of God which has been hidden in past ages, but now is revealed in Christ Jesus.

                            Blane
                            Your thoughts are my thoughts. With our feet down here on the ground, far below God's thoughts.

                            I am thinking that in order to have a thesis (God would reveal His grace) you need an antithesis (some would have to be hated/neglected). Some receive grace unto eternal life. Others do not receive grace unto eternal damnation. My human mind flinches from the totality of the concept, but it does seem to demonstrate the power of grace and its opposite with extreme effect.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Blane View Post
                              Malachi 1:3
                              And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

                              Silly me. I couldn't make sense of this peculiar verse above. I was asking myself what the dragons of the wilderness (demons?) did to inspire God to lay Esau's mountains and heritage waste. But after considering the verse more closely, I don't feel that's what it implies. It seems to be saying that because God hated Esau, He laid his mountains and heritage waste FOR the dragons of the wilderness (to attack and destroy.) Not BECAUSE OF whatever the dragons of the wilderness did to incite God to act against Esau (which is nothing, I was simply misreading the verse.)

                              Blane

                              Malachi 1:3 (KJ21) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 and I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.”


                              Malachi 1:3 (ASV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave his heritage to the jackals of the wilderness.


                              Malachi 1:3 (AMP) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 But [in comparison with the degree of love I have for Jacob] I have hated Esau [Edom] and have laid waste his mountains, and his heritage I have given to the jackals of the wilderness.

                              Malachi 1:3 (CEB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I rejected Esau.
                              I turned Esau’s mountains into desolation,
                              his inheritance into a wilderness for jackals.


                              Malachi 1:3 (CJB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but hated ‘Esav.
                              I made his mountains desolate
                              and gave his territory to desert jackals.”


                              Malachi 1:3 (CEV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 instead of Esau. And I turned Esau’s hill country into a barren desert where jackals roam.


                              Malachi 1:3 (DARBY) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 and I hated Esau; and made his mountains a desolation, and [gave] his inheritance to the jackals of the wilderness.


                              Malachi 1:3 (DRA) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 But have hated Esau? and I have made his mountains a wilderness, and given his inheritance to the dragons of the desert.

                              Malachi 1:3 (ERV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 And I did not accept Esau. I destroyed his hill country. His country was destroyed, and now only wild dogs live there.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (ESV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I have hated. I have laid waste his hill country and left his heritage to jackals of the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (ESVUK) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I have hated. I have laid waste his hill country and left his heritage to jackals of the desert.”


                              Malachi 1:3 (EXB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I ·hated [rejected] Esau [Gen. 25:19–34]. I ·destroyed [laid waste] his mountain country and left his ·land [inheritance] to the ·wild dogs [jackals] of the ·desert [wilderness].”

                              Malachi 1:3 (GNV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 And I hated Esau, and made his mountains waste, and his heritage a wilderness for dragons.

                              Malachi 1:3 (GW) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I hated. I turned his mountains into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the jackals in the desert.

                              Malachi 1:3 (GNT) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 and have hated Esau and his descendants. I have devastated Esau's hill country and abandoned the land to jackals.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (HCSB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I hated Esau. I turned his mountains into a wasteland, and gave his inheritance to the desert jackals.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (ISV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 hated Esau, turned his mountains into a wasteland, and gave his inheritance to desert jackals.

                              Malachi 1:3 (JUB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 and I rejected Esau and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

                              Malachi 1:3 (KJV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

                              Malachi 1:3 (AKJV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 and I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.

                              Malachi 1:3 (LEB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I have hated. I have made his mountain ranges a desolation, and given his inheritance to the jackals of the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:2-3 (TLB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              2-3 “I have loved you very deeply,” says the Lord.

                              But you retort, “Really? When was this?”

                              And the Lord replies, “I showed my love for you by loving your father, Jacob. I didn’t need to. I even rejected his very own brother, Esau, and destroyed Esau’s mountains and inheritance, to give it to the jackals of the desert.


                              Malachi 1:2-3 (MSG) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              2-3 God said, “I love you.”

                              You replied, “Really? How have you loved us?”

                              “Look at history” (this is God’s answer). “Look at how differently I’ve treated you, Jacob, from Esau: I loved Jacob and hated Esau. I reduced pretentious Esau to a molehill, turned his whole country into a ghost town.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (MEV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I have hated, and I have made his mountains a desolation and left his inheritance for the jackals of the desert.

                              Malachi 1:3 (NOG) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I hated. I turned his mountains into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the jackals in the desert.

                              Malachi 1:3 (NABRE) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 Was not Esau Jacob’s brother?—oracle of the Lord.
                              I loved Jacob, but rejected Esau;
                              I made his mountains a waste,
                              his heritage a desert for jackals.


                              Malachi 1:3 (NASB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau, and I have made his mountains a desolation and appointed his inheritance for the jackals of the wilderness.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NCV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I hated Esau. I destroyed his mountain country and left his land to the wild dogs of the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NET) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 and rejected Esau. I turned Esau’s mountains into a deserted wasteland and gave his territory to the wild jackals.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NIRV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 instead of Esau. I turned Esau’s mountains into a dry and empty land. I left that land of Edom to the wild dogs in the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NIV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his hill country into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the desert jackals.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NIVUK) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his hill country into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the desert jackals.’

                              Malachi 1:3 (NKJV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 But Esau I have hated,
                              And laid waste his mountains and his heritage
                              For the jackals of the wilderness.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NLV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau. I have laid waste his mountains and have given his riches to the wild dogs of the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NLT) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I rejected his brother, Esau, and devastated his hill country. I turned Esau’s inheritance into a desert for jackals.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (NRSV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau; I have made his hill country a desolation and his heritage a desert for jackals.

                              Malachi 1:3 (NRSVA) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau; I have made his hill country a desolation and his heritage a desert for jackals.

                              Malachi 1:3 (NRSVACE) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau; I have made his hill country a desolation and his heritage a desert for jackals.

                              Malachi 1:3 (NRSVCE) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau; I have made his hill country a desolation and his heritage a desert for jackals.

                              Malachi 1:3 (OJB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 But I hated Esav, and his mountains and his nachalah I laid waste into wasteland for the jackals of the midbar.

                              Malachi 1:3 (RSV) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau; I have laid waste his hill country and left his heritage to jackals of the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (RSVCE) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I have hated Esau; I have laid waste his hill country and left his heritage to jackals of the desert.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (VOICE) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I hated Esau. I chose you, and I rejected him. I have made his highlands desolate and his inheritance for scavenging jackals in the wilderness.


                              Malachi 1:3 (WEB) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but Esau I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave his heritage to the jackals of the wilderness.”

                              Malachi 1:3 (WYC) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 but I hated Esau? And I have put Seir, the hills of him, into wilderness, and his heritage into dragons of desert. (but I hated Esau? And I have made Seir, his hill country, into a wilderness, and his inheritance into a wilderness fit only for jackals, or for wild animals.)


                              Malachi 1:3 (YLT) | In Context | Whole Chapter
                              3 Is not Esau Jacob's brother? -- an affirmation of Jehovah, And I love Jacob, and Esau I have hated, And I make his mountains a desolation, And his inheritance for dragons of a wilderness.

                              Now no number of translations prove they are correct. But the large number that translate this jackals is something to consider. It may be a term used in that day for wild animals like jackals.

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