Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Spurgeon Devotionals

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Spurgeon Devotionals

    I think I'll begin posting some of these from time to time. I find them very edifying.

  • #2
    “I will help thee, saith the Lord.” - Isaiah 41:14
    Spurgeon Devotional

    This morning let us hear the Lord Jesus speak to each one of us: "I will help thee." "It is but a small thing for me, thy God, to help thee. Consider what I have done already. What! not help thee? Why, I bought thee with my blood. What! not help thee? I have died for thee; and if I have done the greater, will I not do the less? Help thee! It is the least thing I will ever do for thee; I have done more, and will do more. Before the world began I chose thee. I made the covenant for thee. I laid aside my glory and became a man for thee; I gave up my life for thee; and if I did all this, I will surely help thee now. In helping thee, I am giving thee what I have bought for thee already. If thou hadst need of a thousand times as much help, I would give it thee; thou requirest little compared with what I am ready to give. 'Tis much for thee to need, but it is nothing for me to bestow. 'Help thee?' Fear not! If there were an ant at the door of thy granary asking for help, it would not ruin thee to give him a handful of thy wheat; and thou art nothing but a tiny insect at the door of my all-sufficiency. I will help thee."

    O my soul, is not this enough? Dost thou need more strength than the omnipotence of the United Trinity? Dost thou want more wisdom than exists in the Father, more love than displays itself in the Son, or more power than is manifest in the influences of the Spirit? Bring hither thine empty pitcher! Surely this well will fill it. Haste, gather up thy wants, and bring them here--—thine emptiness, thy woes, thy needs. Behold, this river of God is full for thy supply; what canst thou desire beside? Go forth, my soul, in this thy might. The Eternal God is thine helper!

    “Fear not, I am with thee, oh, be not dismay'd!
    I, I am thy God, and will still give thee aid.”
    Last edited by Baruch; January 17, 2018, 01:49 PM. Reason: punct

    Comment


    • #3
      “Do as thou hast said.” - 2 Samuel 7:25
      Spurgeon Devotional

      God’'s promises were never meant to be thrown aside as waste paper; he intended that they should be used. God’'s gold is not miser’s money, but is minted to be traded with. Nothing pleases our Lord better than to see his promises put in circulation; he loves to see his children bring them up to him, and say, "“Lord, do as thou hast said.”" We glorify God when we plead his promises. Do you think that God will be any the poorer for giving you the riches he has promised? Do you dream that he will be any the less holy for giving holiness to you? Do you imagine he will be any the less pure for washing you from your sins?

      He has said, "Come now, and let us reason together," saith the Lord: "though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool." Faith lays hold upon the promise of pardon, and it does not delay, saying, "This is a precious promise, I wonder if it be true?" but it goes straight to the throne with it, and pleads, "Lord, here is the promise, ‘Do as thou hast said." Our Lord replies, "Be it unto thee even as thou wilt." When a Christian grasps a promise, if he does not take it to God, he dishonours him; but when he hastens to the throne of grace, and cries, "Lord, I have nothing to recommend me but this, ‘Thou hast said it;" then his desire shall be granted. Our heavenly Banker delights to cash his own notes.

      Never let the promise rust. Draw the sword of promise out of its scabbard, and use it with holy violence. Think not that God will be troubled by your importunately reminding him of his promises. He loves to hear the loud outcries of needy souls. It is his delight to bestow favours. He is more ready to hear than you are to ask. The sun is not weary of shining, nor the fountain of flowing. It is God’s nature to keep his promises; therefore go at once to the throne with "Do as thou hast said."
      Last edited by Baruch; January 17, 2018, 01:54 PM. Reason: punct

      Comment


      • #4
        The full power of his preaching is demonstrated in these devotional messages.
        So short in length but the message calls for the examination of faith while offering the riches of His glory.
        Truly, each are double edged swords.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Barry. I am moved by these. Please post more.

          Comment


          • #6
            "Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you." - 1 Peter 5:7
            Spurgeon Devotional

            It is a happy way of soothing sorrow when we can feel— "HE careth for me." Christian! do not dishonour religion by always wearing a brow of care; come, cast your burden upon your Lord. You are staggering beneath a weight which your Father would not feel. What seems to you a crushing burden, would be to him but as the small dust of the balance. Nothing is so sweet as to

            "Lie passive in God’s hands,
            And know no will but his."

            O child of suffering, be thou patient; God has not passed thee over in his providence. He who is the feeder of sparrows, will also furnish you with what you need. Sit not down in despair; hope on, hope ever. Take up the arms of faith against a sea of trouble, and your opposition shall yet end your distresses. There is One who careth for you. His eye is fixed on you, his heart beats with pity for your woe, and his hand omnipotent shall yet bring you the needed help. The darkest cloud shall scatter itself in showers of mercy. The blackest gloom shall give place to the morning. He, if thou art one of his family, will bind up thy wounds, and heal thy broken heart. Doubt not his grace because of thy tribulation, but believe that he loveth thee as much in seasons of trouble as in times of happiness. What a serene and quiet life might you lead if you would leave providing to the God of providence! With a little oil in the cruse, and a handful of meal in the barrel, Elijah outlived the famine, and you will do the same. If God cares for you, why need you care too? Can you trust him for your soul, and not for your body? He has never refused to bear your burdens, he has never fainted under their weight. Come, then, soul! have done with fretful care, and leave all thy concerns in the hand of a gracious God.

            Comment


            • #7
              "Abel was a keeper of sheep." - Genesis 4:2
              Spurgeon Devotional

              As a shepherd Abel sanctified his work to the glory of God, and offered a sacrifice of blood upon his altar, and the Lord had respect unto Abel and his offering. This early type of our Lord is exceedingly clear and distinct. Like the first streak of light which tinges the east at sunrise, it does not reveal everything, but it clearly manifests the great fact that the sun is coming. As we see Abel, a shepherd and yet a priest, offering a sacrifice of sweet smell unto God, we discern our Lord, who brings before his Father a sacrifice to which Jehovah ever hath respect. Abel was hated by his brother—hated without a cause; and even so was the Saviour: the natural and carnal man hated the accepted man in whom the Spirit of grace was found, and rested not until his blood had been shed. Abel fell, and sprinkled his altar and sacrifice with his own blood, and therein sets forth the Lord Jesus slain by the enmity of man while serving as a priest before the Lord. "The good Shepherd layeth down his life for the sheep." Let us weep over him as we view him slain by the hatred of mankind, staining the horns of his altar with his own blood. Abel’s blood speaketh. "The Lord said unto Cain, 'The voice of thy brother’s blood crieth unto me from the ground.'" The blood of Jesus hath a mighty tongue, and the import of its prevailing cry is not vengeance but mercy. It is precious beyond all preciousness to stand at the altar of our good Shepherd! to see him bleeding there as the slaughtered priest, and then to hear his blood speaking peace to all his flock, peace in our conscience, peace between Jew and Gentile, peace between man and his offended Maker, peace all down the ages of eternity for blood-washed men. Abel is the first shepherd in order of time, but our hearts shall ever place Jesus first in order of excellence. Thou great Keeper of the sheep, we the people of thy pasture bless thee with our whole hearts when we see thee slain for us.

              Comment


              • #8
                "I have exalted one chosen out of the people." - Psalm 89:19
                Spurgeon Devotional

                Why was Christ chosen out of the people? Speak, my heart, for heart-thoughts are best. Was it not that he might be able to be our brother, in the blest tie of kindred blood? Oh, what relationship there is between Christ and the believer! The believer can say, "I have a Brother in heaven; I may be poor, but I have a Brother who is rich, and is a King, and will he suffer me to want while he is on his throne? Oh, no! He loves me; he is my Brother." Believer, wear this blessed thought, like a necklace of diamonds, around the neck of thy memory; put it, as a golden ring, on the finger of recollection, and use it as the King’s own seal, stamping the petitions of thy faith with confidence of success. He is a brother born for adversity, treat him as such.

                Christ was also chosen out of the people that he might know our wants and sympathize with us. "He was tempted in all points like as we are, yet without sin." In all our sorrows we have his sympathy. Temptation, pain, disappointment, weakness, weariness, poverty—he knows them all, for he has felt all. Remember this, Christian, and let it comfort thee. However difficult and painful thy road, it is marked by the footsteps of thy Saviour; and even when thou reachest the dark valley of the shadow of death, and the deep waters of the swelling Jordan, thou wilt find his footprints there. In all places whithersoever we go, he has been our forerunner; each burden we have to carry, has once been laid on the shoulders of Immanuel.

                "His way was much rougher and darker than mine
                Did Christ, my Lord, suffer, and shall I repine?"
                Take courage! Royal feet have left a blood-red track upon the road, and consecrated the thorny path forever.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Baruch View Post
                  "Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you." - 1 Peter 5:7
                  Spurgeon Devotional

                  It is a happy way of soothing sorrow when we can feel— "HE careth for me." Christian! do not dishonour religion by always wearing a brow of care; come, cast your burden upon your Lord. You are staggering beneath a weight which your Father would not feel. What seems to you a crushing burden, would be to him but as the small dust of the balance. Nothing is so sweet as to

                  "Lie passive in God’s hands,
                  And know no will but his."

                  O child of suffering, be thou patient; God has not passed thee over in his providence. He who is the feeder of sparrows, will also furnish you with what you need. Sit not down in despair; hope on, hope ever. Take up the arms of faith against a sea of trouble, and your opposition shall yet end your distresses. There is One who careth for you. His eye is fixed on you, his heart beats with pity for your woe, and his hand omnipotent shall yet bring you the needed help. The darkest cloud shall scatter itself in showers of mercy. The blackest gloom shall give place to the morning. He, if thou art one of his family, will bind up thy wounds, and heal thy broken heart. Doubt not his grace because of thy tribulation, but believe that he loveth thee as much in seasons of trouble as in times of happiness. What a serene and quiet life might you lead if you would leave providing to the God of providence! With a little oil in the cruse, and a handful of meal in the barrel, Elijah outlived the famine, and you will do the same. If God cares for you, why need you care too? Can you trust him for your soul, and not for your body? He has never refused to bear your burdens, he has never fainted under their weight. Come, then, soul! have done with fretful care, and leave all thy concerns in the hand of a gracious God.
                  =========================
                  I am pleased to have the opportunity to respond to this particular devotional.

                  Sparrows are eaten by cats and die from other causes. It is not that God feeds the sparrow, as Spurgeon states it, but that God is aware of each sparrow. Only in the most general sense of the meaning can it be said that God feeds the sparrows in that all things come from God.
                  Luke 12:6 NIV
                  Are not five sparrows sold for two pennies? Yet not one of them is forgotten by God.

                  Like this devotional, preaching in the prosperous nations will often make promises like that made by Surgeon when he stated God “will also "furnish you with what you need.”" . . . and "“Can you trust him for your soul, and not for your body?" ” What we think we need is most often not what God provides. For most of the world’s population there are not sufficient resources or justice to overcome difficulties. If this devotional message was made to many of the depressed peoples of the world they would reject such ideas as foolishness.

                  Most of Spurgeon'’s devotional is about trusting God in difficult times. Comfort and peace comes from trusting God rather than having the difficulties removed which what this devotional implies. The spiritual value of this devotional would be much better if it focused on divine strength to endure difficulties through divine grace.

                  There are many more possibilities for those living in a prosperous nation. Yet, even in our own blessed place, there are many devout believers who suffer difficulties for which no supernatural or natural solution is received.

                  We must ask. What is it the Gospel of the Lord Jesus provides?
                  And when we ask it must be with the conscious recognition of these things.
                  John the Baptist was beheaded.
                  Steven was stoned.
                  Apostle James the brother of John was thrown from the temple wall and stoned.
                  Apostle John was beaten.
                  Apostle Peter was beaten and crucified.
                  Apostle Paul had a “thorn in the flesh.”
                  Apostle Paul was beaten many times and finally beheaded.
                  Church history records that 10 of the 11 apostles died a martyr’s death.

                  Spurgeon’'s devotional has a marvelous observation. “"O child of suffering, be thou patient; God has not passed thee over in his providence.”" This is true. However, this is not a promise of receiving a solution of our design or of receiving any recognizable solution apart from suffering in our relationship with God. Being Christian, that is, being in fellowship with God, means when there are difficulties we suffer victoriously when we hold His Hand. If there is a supernatural solution it is to forward His plan and not to appease our suffering. Otherwise, Christians would not suffer.

                  Two relevant examples come to mind.
                  First is the beggar of Acts 3, lame from birth, probably begged at the Beautiful Gate of the Temple during the several visits to the Temple by the Lord Jesus. The Lord did not provide him with a normal body. This waited for the Apostle Peter to say "““I have no silver and gold, but what I do have I give to you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise up and walk!”" Apparently, this miracle served the plan of God at this place and time and with the Apostle Peter.

                  Acts 3:2 ESV
                  2 And a man lame from birth was being carried, whom they laid daily at the gate of the temple that is called the Beautiful Gate to ask alms of those entering the temple.

                  Second example comes from John 9 when the Lord Jesus gave sight to the man blind from birth.

                  John 9:1-3 ESV As he passed by, he saw a man blind from birth. 2 And his disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” 3 Jesus answered, “It was not that this man sinned, or his parents, but that the works of God might be displayed in him.

                  This miracle was not about relieving the suffering of this blind man, but it was a sign, a display of the works of God for this place and time and with the Lord Jesus.

                  Miracles serve the purpose of signs or as a display to authenticate the plan of God in redemption. Such signs might be as grand as the Resurrection of the Lord Jesus or as insignificant as to be just to be wonder at by the individual. But the purpose is always the same –- the establishment of the plan of God.

                  And this presents the conundrum of authenticating miracles. Having to use modern medical devices to authenticate a miracle seems to make it less of a sign because not everyone can see or witness the evidence. Knowledge of the miracle is hearsay.

                  On the other hand, where my brother’ served in San Angelo, there where were several miracles. One man in his pre-Christian life was a notoriously mean, dishonest, drug user. He beat his wife, stole from his clients, was drunk much of the time, etc. Upon conversion he became a new creature –- overnight so to say. His former notoriety was so immense that his new life in Christ was so vibrant that a constant stream of evil doers came to the church to see what had happened. The miracle of his life brought many o the Lord.

                  If the Christian needs miracles for his own edification, he is a crippled Christian who God has to prop up. Individually experienced miracles are not the meat of our spiritual nourishment but the added spice so we might feel authenticated by God.

                  What the Christian ought to expect from God is directly proportional to the Christian’s usefulness for the plan of God. This presents another conundrum of discernment as to who is being useful. Is it . . ? Left off is a list of about 90 well known current ministers - both famous and notorious. Most of them claim to heal people or that God heals people through them.

                  All this to say that suffering by a Christians does not have a simplistic justification or solution.
                  But when a Christian suffers, trusting God does have a simplistic justification and an eternal solution.
                  Last edited by glen smith; January 24, 2018, 09:03 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dear brother Glen. One who reads enough of Spurgeon will soon discover that he does not preach a one-dimensional God, nor a prosperity message, nor a miracles-on-demand message. He preaches a sovereign God who is very complex in His dealings with us, and loves mercy; especially mercy on His elect children.

                    I would not generally give devotionals to the heathen. Surely, not knowing much of God or His word, they would misapply them. I daresay the heathen benefit solely from the unadorned, unapologetic Gospel.

                    Devotionals are by design short and focused. I don't think I'm telling you something new. The best ones extol the virtues and glory of God. If we just let the devotional say what it says, and balance it with what we also know from the whole counsel of God then we may be greatly enriched by it. Personally, I would appreciate an edifying addition rather than taking away from it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Brother Baruch,
                      Your insight into a devotional compared to a sermon is appreciated. However, there are those in our world who actually expand on some of these implied ideas ipresented in Spurgeon's devotional to create false hope for those who suffer. The England in which Spurgeon preached had an abundant of social ills and suffering. I don't think he was teaching what I see as implied. My thought was not to "take away" from this devotional or Spurgeon but to provide a qualification for those who might be discouraged because their experience does not mirror the blessing when they read God “will also "furnish you with what you need.”" . . . and "“Can you trust him for your soul, and not for your body?"

                      Forgive me in that I caused you to see my qualifications aimed at this devotional as taking away rather than clarification.
                      I actual thought I summarized the devotional well by stating, "Most of Spurgeon'’s devotional is about trusting God in difficult times. Comfort and peace comes from trusting God rather than having the difficulties removed which what this devotional implies. The spiritual value of this devotional would be much better if it focused on divine strength to endure difficulties through divine grace."
                      Does this summary statement describe or not describe the suffering experience of most believers?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Of course I forgive you, brother Glen. How could I not forgive all, when our Lord has already done so? I'm humbled that you asked. Please forgive my blunt words which lacked grace, and put you in the position. I am sorry.

                        I appreciate your emphasis, which re-centers my understanding. I see what you meant. You're right in pointing out the difference between Spurgeon's time and ours. His ministry dealt with the plagued and terminally ill in a time of general poverty. We live comparatively in a very easy time. There are degrees we need to be mindful of, and you're very right to point this out, and qualify it for those who might misconstrue it.

                        You reminded me of all those in the Scriptures whose suffering is preserved there for us. I think I, like many of us, may tend to focus on the suffering because we're made to dread and avoid pain; so much that we inadvertently take for granted its absence. We are relieved when pain is lifted and very grateful for a time, but then our attention moves on to other pains and discomforts and we may forget that merciful deliverance.

                        Thus, I ponder: Paul suffered his thorn and many injuries and dangers, and finally execution under a blade, yet we can infer he was very blessed even physically in many ways. The grace with which Paul bore his copious sufferings is, to me, miraculous. God called Paul to suffering, but He also restored and upheld him in his trials. Without healing I imagine Paul would not have endured. This could be said of many saints.

                        Spurgeon suffered very painful gout and eventually died of it, yet he saw so clearly God's readiness to heal that he could write this glowing devotional in honor of our Lord. Even as the Psalmists do.

                        I reflect often on my past illnesses and injuries and narrow misses. Satan and his kingdom try to steal God's glory: doctors, medicine, knowledge healed you; you're body was made to self-heal; you got through it because you're tough and you had to; close call, thank your lucky stars and your cautious nature. Nowadays, I endeavor to see the hand of God in all of those times, without whom Satan would have robbed me even of life. But God! Our Lord's providence is not reactionary; it is general and provisional; it starts before I even get to the point of crying out in need. Being pushed to the point of acknowledging and giving voice to that need causes me to be habitually more mindful of Him.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "Your heavenly Father." - Matthew 6:26
                          Spurgeon Devotional

                          God's people are doubly his children, they are his offspring by creation, and they are his sons by adoption in Christ. Hence they are privileged to call him, "Our Father which art in heaven."

                          Father! Oh, what precious word is that. Here is authority: "If I be a Father, where is mine honour?" If ye be sons, where is your obedience? Here is affection mingled with authority; an authority which does not provoke rebellion; an obedience demanded which is most cheerfully rendered—which would not be withheld even if it might. The obedience which God’s children yield to him must be loving obedience. Do not go about the service of God as slaves to their taskmaster’s toil, but run in the way of his commands because it is your Father's way. Yield your bodies as instruments of righteousness, because righteousness is your Father's will, and his will should be the will of his child.

                          Father!—Here is a kingly attribute so sweetly veiled in love, that the King's crown is forgotten in the King's face, and his sceptre becomes, not a rod of iron, but a silver sceptre of mercy—the sceptre indeed seems to be forgotten in the tender hand of him who wields it.

                          Father!—Here is honour and love. How great is a Father's love to his children! That which friendship cannot do, and mere benevolence will not attempt, a father's heart and hand must do for his sons. They are his offspring, he must bless them; they are his children, he must show himself strong in their defence. If an earthly father watches over his children with unceasing love and care, how much more does our heavenly Father?

                          Abba, Father! He who can say this, hath uttered better music than cherubim or seraphim can reach. There is heaven in the depth of that word—Father! There is all I can ask; all my necessities can demand; all my wishes can desire. I have all in all to all eternity when I can say, "Father."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Surgeon marks out in this devotional one of the three most significant elements* of the New Testament. In the Old Testament God as Father only appears 15 times in 14 verses. There are other Old Testament references which imply YHWH as a father.
                            Examples: sons of God; children of God; and similes of fatherhood.
                            However, in the New Testament there are 262 occurrences where ‘Father’ refers to God. It is a significant part of the message of the Lord Jesus in that it occurs 184 times in the gospels.

                            Furthermore, Surgeon makes the important distinction between God as the creator is the father of all people and God as the spiritual father of His spiritual children. This is extremely important in this time of new age popularity where the claim is that all people are the children of God and use this concept to produce doctrines opposite to biblical doctrines. The aspect of the fatherhood of God which is missing from this devotional is God is the Father of the Lord Jesus Christ.

                            There exists an extensive Bible study on the Fatherhood of God in my repertoire if anyone is interested in it being posted.

                            Footnote:
                            *The 3 most significant elements of the ministry of the Lord Jesus and the New Testament are: Redemption, Kingdom of God; Fatherhood of God.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for your thoughtful comment, Glen.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X