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  • Good quotes on repentance

    I found these quotes were very thought provoking. Hopefully they will help us change our lives for Christ.


    GREAT QUOTES on REPENTANCE

    "There was a day when I died; died to self, my opinions, preferences,
    tastes and will; died to the world, its approval or censure; died to
    the approval or blame even of my brethren or friends; and since
    then I have studied only to show myself approved unto God."
    - George Mueller

    "Many mourn for their sins that do not truly repent of them, weep
    bitterly for them, and yet continue in love and league with them."
    - Matthew Henry

    "True repentance is no light matter. It is a thorough change of heart
    about sin, a change showing itself in godly sorrow and humiliation -
    in heartfelt confession before the throne of grace - in a complete
    breaking off from sinful habits, and an abiding hatred of all sin. Such
    repentance is the inseparable companion of saving faith in Christ."
    - J. C. Ryle

    "Unless you have made a complete surrender and are doing his
    will it will avail you nothing if you've reformed a thousand times
    and have your name on fifty church records."
    - Billy Sunday

    "Repentance, as we know, is basically not moaning and remorse,
    but turning and change."
    - J.I. Packer

    "People who cover their faults and excuse themselves do not have
    a repentant spirit."
    - Watchman Nee

  • #2
    Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post
    I found these quotes were very thought provoking. Hopefully they will help us change our lives for Christ.


    GREAT QUOTES on REPENTANCE

    "There was a day when I died; died to self, my opinions, preferences,
    tastes and will; died to the world, its approval or censure; died to
    the approval or blame even of my brethren or friends; and since
    then I have studied only to show myself approved unto God."
    - George Mueller

    "Many mourn for their sins that do not truly repent of them, weep
    bitterly for them, and yet continue in love and league with them."
    - Matthew Henry

    "True repentance is no light matter. It is a thorough change of heart
    about sin, a change showing itself in godly sorrow and humiliation -
    in heartfelt confession before the throne of grace - in a complete
    breaking off from sinful habits, and an abiding hatred of all sin. Such
    repentance is the inseparable companion of saving faith in Christ."
    - J. C. Ryle

    "Unless you have made a complete surrender and are doing his
    will it will avail you nothing if you've reformed a thousand times
    and have your name on fifty church records."
    - Billy Sunday

    "Repentance, as we know, is basically not moaning and remorse,
    but turning and change."
    - J.I. Packer

    "People who cover their faults and excuse themselves do not have
    a repentant spirit."
    - Watchman Nee
    Some of these quotes put a new light on repentance for me. They have made it a much more serious subject and I have repented for some things that I had accepted as OK, when they were not OK.

    Did any of these effect you ?

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes they did and I am not happy with my sinfulness and worse than anything else is my inability to change myself.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
        Yes they did and I am not happy with my sinfulness and worse than anything else is my inability to change myself.
        Thanks for the reply Steve.

        Here is a passage from the Holy Scriptures that speaks about what you have said:
        Ezekiel 9English Standard Version (ESV)

        Idolaters Killed

        9 Then he cried in my ears with a loud voice, saying, “Bring near the executioners of the city, each with his destroying weapon in his hand.”2 And behold, six men came from the direction of the upper gate, which faces north, each with his weapon for slaughter in his hand, and with them was a man clothed in linen, with a writing case at his waist. And they went in and stood beside the bronze altar.

        3 Now the glory of the God of Israel had gone up from the cherub on which it rested to the threshold of the house. And he called to the man clothed in linen, who had the writing case at his waist. 4 And the Lord said to him, “Pass through the city, through Jerusalem, and put a mark on the foreheads of the men who sigh and groan over all the abominations that are committed in it.” 5 And to the others he said in my hearing, “Pass through the city after him, and strike. Your eye shall not spare, and you shall show no pity. 6 Kill old men outright, young men and maidens, little children and women, but touch no one on whom is the mark. And begin at my sanctuary.” So they began with the elders who were before the house. 7 Then he said to them, “Defile the house, and fill the courts with the slain. Go out.” So they went out and struck in the city. 8 And while they were striking, and I was left alone, I fell upon my face, and cried, “Ah, Lord God! Will you destroy all the remnant of Israel in the outpouring of your wrath on Jerusalem?”

        9 Then he said to me, “The guilt of the house of Israel and Judah is exceedingly great. The land is full of blood, and the city full of injustice. For they say, ‘The Lord has forsaken the land, and the Lord does not see.’ 10 As for me, my eye will not spare, nor will I have pity; I will bring their deeds upon their heads.”

        11 And behold, the man clothed in linen, with the writing case at his waist, brought back word, saying, “I have done as you commanded me.”



        Note from Lou:

        Who is Judah in this passage: well that is those who CLAIM to be God's people.

        Out of all of those who claim to be God's people, who were spared ? Only the FEW
        who sigh and groan over all the abominations that are committed in it.”

        Is The Lord speaking of those who groan and lament over the abominations committed in the world, or other lands ?

        NO, The Lord is speaking of those who groan over the sins that those who claim to be God's people commit.

        I see many preachers saying they groan over the sins of the US. But the US no longer claims to be God's people. So today would not God be speaking about those who groan over the abominations they see in the church of our land. For it is only the church who claims to be God's people.

        Who is the closet person in the church to me. That would be me. I should be groaning over my sins.

        What about those who are boasting they no longer sin like they used to before they met Christ. Well those did not get the mark, because they were not groaning over their sin.

        What about the those who the church regarded as their leaders. Well they started by killing the ELDERS in front of the Temple.

        I find this passage to be a very sobering one.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes indeed, who wants to be a leader with judgment looming overhead. I have enough to be ashamed of on my own. Leading others astray is not something I would want to be responsible for.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
            Yes indeed, who wants to be a leader with judgment looming overhead. I have enough to be ashamed of on my own. Leading others astray is not something I would want to be responsible for.
            Thanks for the reply Steve.

            Notice where the leaders of those who claim to be the people of God were, that were destroyed. They were the ones IN FRONT OF THE TEMPLE. They put themselves forth for the people to notice. They gather men after themselves. But there are other leaders that God has chosen that are IN the Temple working instead of in front of the Temple. The people do not notice these men and these men serve The Lord, and point to Him instead of gathering men after themselves.

            The world knows the names of the leaders in front of the Temple. But the world has not heard of or seen the ones working inside of the Temple.

            The moon is a shadow of the church. It has two sides. The one side focuses on the world and the world sees that side. The other side does not look at the world and the world has never seen that side. That is the true body of Christ. It focuses on the Sun, that is a shadow of Christ.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for the explanation of that Lou I never looked at it that way. I hope I can be on the inside of the temple. Wherever the Lord puts me is fine though. I used to think I had to preach and try to save people, and since have learned that it is not I that do the saving or the preaching if it's to have an effect. Thanks for pointing all that out to me Lou. I used to think I had to have souls to my credit or I would be at risk or not as blessed, but now I understand that it is and always was God that does the saving and so how can we be credited for it.

              Comment


              • #8
                I appreciated the quotes. Thanks, Lou. I did not comment, I think, because I am sensitive lately to a proliferation of legalism. I see it everywhere. Maybe not because it is growing, rather I am noticing it more. It is certainly important we refrain from sin, and turn to God. The law is our measure, by which we can often tell if we have strayed from the path of righteousness. Some have said, and I agree, that we ought to balance our speech: fire and brimstone, but also sprinkled with grace. It may be a mistake to preach all judgement, or all grace. I am beginning to get settled into this frame of mind.

                I admit those quotes struck me as the law does, sharp judgement and no grace. I don't mean anything by saying that, other than it was my reaction to the words. Now that I have had some time to ponder, and there is some dialogue I feel more comfortable joining in.

                Dan 12:1 And at that time shall Michael stand up, the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people: and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time: and at that time thy people shall be delivered, every one that shall be found written in the book. 2 And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. 3 And they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.

                My attention is on verse 3. From the context, these are apparently the saints of God in the last days. We have been in the last days since Paul's time, so it seems approprate just to conclude that "all scripture applies" when interpreting this verse.

                Steve, your comment brought this to my mind. Who are they that are wise, and turn many to righteousness? I used to think these are solely the preachers who go out and save the lost. I must be like them! There seems to be a promise of assurance there, if I can shine as they do.

                Jas 5:17 Elias was a man subject to like passions as we are, and he prayed earnestly that it might not rain: and it rained not on the earth by the space of three years and six months. 18 And he prayed again, and the heaven gave rain, and the earth brought forth her fruit. 19 Brethren, if any of you do err from the truth, and one convert him; 20 Let him know, that he which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.

                I, and I think most do, hold Elias in esteem. I was impressed by his feats. He seems to shine, not with his own light but of the Spirit. This passage says he is like the rest of us. Made of the dust, same afflictions. But he was a vessel for the Lord, that made all the difference.

                We have the calling to pray as Elias did, and to convert sinners as he was sent to do. We have authority to shut up the heavens or make it rain: spiritually by giving or denying drink to the thirsty, and at times naturally; we have power when it is God's will. We are just children, as Elias was, who please God when we walk in faith.

                Considering verses 19-20, when we participate in "converting" an errant brother, is that not turning someone to righteousness? When a brother is down, worrying, hurt or in despair, and is not walking in faith: whatever is not of faith is sin. If we restore one to the walk of faith, we turn him/her back to Christ. Charity covers a multitude of sins.

                The church, God's people, is the body of Christ. We together, the new men of Spirit, are new Jerusalem. The Eze 9 passage Lou posted specifies Jerusalem as the venue, so we should be correct in applying the inner/outer courts and most holy relation. Also, there are two obvious "scopes": the man, and the corporate body. We as individual persons and corporate body aren't perfected (mature) yet, we are maturing. It is the head that perfects us, Christ, by His spirit dwelling in us. We are alive with His life. We have fellowship when we walk together with Him. Christ ministers to us. And while we minister to each other we minister to Christ.

                Does this shine as the brightness of the firmament and the stars?

                If the body is not ministering to itself--truly to Christ--you get for example Eze 9.

                One of the things we are called to is to share in Christ's suffering. He sighs and cries at the abominations committed in Jerusalem. He is recorded doing so in the New Testament as a man, and many times in the Old Testament. This is just something we should share in because we are of the same spirit.

                Coming full circle, there is a season and a time for every purpose under heaven. We can focus on one thing to the exclusion of all else. It can consume us. We may fall and cannot get up without help. When we focus so, it behooves us to not forget all God's benefits, His grace, and His mercy.

                Bless you.
                Last edited by Baruch; May 22, 2016, 04:40 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bless you too Barry. I agree with much of what you write often.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
                    Thanks for the explanation of that Lou I never looked at it that way. I hope I can be on the inside of the temple. Wherever the Lord puts me is fine though. I used to think I had to preach and try to save people, and since have learned that it is not I that do the saving or the preaching if it's to have an effect. Thanks for pointing all that out to me Lou. I used to think I had to have souls to my credit or I would be at risk or not as blessed, but now I understand that it is and always was God that does the saving and so how can we be credited for it.
                    Thanks so much for all of your replies Steve. It is very hard to write if I get no replies. The Lord almost always inspires me to write something to answer every reply. It is in this conversation that The Lord teaches us many things.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have learned a wealth of knowledge from frequenting this site alone. I appreciate it very much and I am both thankful and grateful. How hard is it to find a drink of cool water in the middle of the hot desert in a drought. Thank you Jesus.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Baruch View Post
                        I appreciated the quotes. Thanks, Lou. I did not comment, I think, because I am sensitive lately to a proliferation of legalism. I see it everywhere. Maybe not because it is growing, rather I am noticing it more. It is certainly important we refrain from sin, and turn to God. The law is our measure, by which we can often tell if we have strayed from the path of righteousness. Some have said, and I agree, that we ought to balance our speech: fire and brimstone, but also sprinkled with grace. It may be a mistake to preach all judgement, or all grace. I am beginning to get settled into this frame of mind.

                        I admit those quotes struck me as the law does, sharp judgement and no grace. I don't mean anything by saying that, other than it was my reaction to the words. Now that I have had some time to ponder, and there is some dialogue I feel more comfortable joining in.

                        Dan 12:1 And at that time shall Michael stand up, the great prince which standeth for the children of thy people: and there shall be a time of trouble, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time: and at that time thy people shall be delivered, every one that shall be found written in the book. 2 And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. 3 And they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.

                        My attention is on verse 3. From the context, these are apparently the saints of God in the last days. We have been in the last days since Paul's time, so it seems approprate just to conclude that "all scripture applies" when interpreting this verse.

                        Steve, your comment brought this to my mind. Who are they that are wise, and turn many to righteousness? I used to think these are solely the preachers who go out and save the lost. I must be like them! There seems to be a promise of assurance there, if I can shine as they do.

                        Jas 5:17 Elias was a man subject to like passions as we are, and he prayed earnestly that it might not rain: and it rained not on the earth by the space of three years and six months. 18 And he prayed again, and the heaven gave rain, and the earth brought forth her fruit. 19 Brethren, if any of you do err from the truth, and one convert him; 20 Let him know, that he which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.

                        I, and I think most do, hold Elias in esteem. I was impressed by his feats. He seems to shine, not with his own light but of the Spirit. This passage says he is like the rest of us. Made of the dust, same afflictions. But he was a vessel for the Lord, that made all the difference.

                        We have the calling to pray as Elias did, and to convert sinners as he was sent to do. We have authority to shut up the heavens or make it rain: spiritually by giving or denying drink to the thirsty, and at times naturally; we have power when it is God's will. We are just children, as Elias was, who please God when we walk in faith.

                        Considering verses 19-20, when we participate in "converting" an errant brother, is that not turning someone to righteousness? When a brother is down, worrying, hurt or in despair, and is not walking in faith: whatever is not of faith is sin. If we restore one to the walk of faith, we turn him/her back to Christ. Charity covers a multitude of sins.

                        The church, God's people, is the body of Christ. We together, the new men of Spirit, are new Jerusalem. The Eze 9 passage Lou posted specifies Jerusalem as the venue, so we should be correct in applying the inner/outer courts and most holy relation. Also, there are two obvious "scopes": the man, and the corporate body. We as individual persons and corporate body aren't perfected (mature) yet, we are maturing. It is the head that perfects us, Christ, by His spirit dwelling in us. We are alive with His life. We have fellowship when we walk together with Him. Christ ministers to us. And while we minister to each other we minister to Christ.

                        Does this shine as the brightness of the firmament and the stars?

                        If the body is not ministering to itself--truly to Christ--you get for example Eze 9.

                        One of the things we are called to is to share in Christ's suffering. He sighs and cries at the abominations committed in Jerusalem. He is recorded doing so in the New Testament as a man, and many times in the Old Testament. This is just something we should share in because we are of the same spirit.

                        Coming full circle, there is a season and a time for every purpose under heaven. We can focus on one thing to the exclusion of all else. It can consume us. We may fall and cannot get up without help. When we focus so, it behooves us to not forget all God's benefits, His grace, and His mercy.

                        Bless you.
                        Hi Barry, thanks for your reply. You made some very good observations and comments above. You have inspired these thoughts below.

                        God never teaches us to be legalistic in the Holy Scriptures. But God does show us how evil legalism is by showing us examples, like the Pharisees, and it leads to some very evil deeds. It was legalism that led to the Crucifixion of Jesus.

                        Some think that the OT is legalistic, but it is not. Abraham is the father of our faith ( our Christian faith). He was saved by confessing his sins to God and then trusting Him to save him.

                        No one is going to be made one bit more righteous by observing any law. For while we observe that law, we are breaking many more laws.

                        Jesus spoke to man about many things in the NT and gave warnings with many of those messages. For instance, Jesus told us about His return in Matthew, but started with the warning, "watch out that no one deceives you".

                        John walked, talked, heard, and even touched Jesus; and this is the message that John tells us that Jesus came to deliver to man:

                        1 John 1
                        5 This is the message we have heard from him and proclaim to you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all. 6 If we say we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth. 7 But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin. 8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10 If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.

                        There is only one way we as liars can walk in the light as Jesus walked in the light. That is to confess that we are total liars. The only way a liar can tell the truth is to admit he is a liar. God clearly says that all men are liars and only God is true.

                        8 If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. 10 If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.


                        The Lord pointed out to me this morning, that he gave no warning with the message above.

                        Jesus did not warn, watch out that you do not confess your sins too much. I find that confessing my sins always makes me feel more free and have more joy.

                        9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

                        Jesus promises to cleanse us of all unrighteousness when we confess our sins. All of His works, including this one are all good.

                        I knew some people who went to a certain denomination church. Looking back, there seemed to be two groups of people that attended that church. There were the preacher, and many who followed his example, that told others to repent of their sins. They seemed to abuse the other group and looked down upon them as very bad sinners.

                        The other group that were always confessing their sin, did seem to be abused by the preacher and his followers. BUT I can say this. The preacher and those in his group were a pain to be around. They seemed arrogant and I did not see any evidence of their salvation. ( I do not judge, just state what I may have observed)

                        In fact I sold cars at this used car dealer and the salesmen were very competitive. They would race to wait on anyone who came on the lot. But when a car load of people from this church drove on the lot, they all ran away in the opposite direction. No one wanted to wait on them. they were very unpleasant to be around.

                        But those that attended that same church, that were in the other group, that were always repenting, were a joy to be around. They were humble and always looking to see who they could serve and help in some way.

                        My point is this: while the preacher did in my opinion abuse this group with his constant preaching telling them they were terrible sinners and they needed to repent, THEY SEEMED TO BENEFIT FROM THIS CONSTANT REPENTANCE.

                        Now of course, I am speaking of true confession of sin. Not some confessing that I am guilty of a few very small sins, which of course implies, that I do not commit many very serious sins. That, of course is false repentance.

                        If a man confesses he sometimes tells little lies, then he is lying in that confession.

                        The only way for a man to truly confess that he is the lair that he is, is to confess that everything he says is a lie and he does not even know the truth.

                        Now, while it is true, that we do know Jesus, who is The Truth, we do not fully know Him as he fully knows us. We only see him ( and the truth) in a foggy mirror. A foggy image of the truth, is not really the truth.

                        We are all blind, death, and lame. The more we are aware of this and confess it to The Lord, the more He gives us sight, hearing, and helps us to walk.

                        We have the example of the Pharisees who went to the temple and falsely confessed their sin, or confessed a few small sins. Jesus told Simon that he was forgiven of LITTLE. This is because Simon confessed LITTLE.

                        But Mary was forgiven of MUCH, and loved Jesus much. This is because she had confessed MUCH sin and so was forgiven of much sin.

                        Lou Newton
                        Last edited by Lou Newton; May 23, 2016, 08:56 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thank you Lou. It is reassuring to be reminded that I am worse than I thought yet much better off than I thought.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am getting desperately afraid of going to heaven for I have had the vision of the shame I shall suffer as I get my first glimpse of the Lord Jesus; His majesty, power and marvellous love for me, who treated Him so meanly and shabbily on earth, and acted as though I did Him a favour in serving Him! No wonder God shall have to wipe away the tears off all faces, for we shall be broken-hearted when we see the depth of His love and the shallowness of ours.
                            C.T.Studd

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Repentance is a gift of God. Oswald Chambers

                              Comment

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