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  • What Are the Odds of You Being You?

    I had thought about writing an article about this subject, and today this was in my mail box.

    We each have 23 chromosomes from our father and 23 chromosomes from our mother. So just how many different humans beings can be made from these 23 pairs of chromosomes.

    That would be 223 x 223 = 70,368,744,180,000

    You read that right, over 70 TRILLION, and every one would be different. They would all have different genes.

    So if Adam and Eve were our direct parents we would all still be different. There have probably been only about 14 billion people ever born on this planet. So the odds of any two being alike would be extremely remote.

    BUT we all do not have Adam and Eve for our direct parents. So the odds would be so low that it would be mathematically impossible for two to be alike. ( except of course for identical twins)

    As you read the article below, I would like to add one thing. God never breaks any of His laws. He is not a lawbreaker. The virgin birth and Jesus rising from the dead both are within God's laws somehow.



    What Are the Odds of You Being You?

    October 27, 2014

    By Guest Writer

    For you created my inmost being;
    you knit me together in my mother’s womb.
    I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made;
    your works are wonderful,
    I know that full well.


    — Psalm 139:13–14

    When anticipating the birth of a child—be it our own or a grandchild, niece or nephew—we might find ourselves contemplating the wonder of human life and the way in which God designs each unique person. Certainly life is a miracle—but what kind of miracle? I’d suggest that each and every one of us is an example of a hypernatural miracle.

    Theologian Daniel Dyke and physicist Hugh Henry describe hypernaturalism as “the extraordinary use of natural law by the God described in the Bible,”1 distinguishing it from supernaturalism, which operates outside the natural laws (supernatural miracles would include the Virgin birth and resurrection of Christ from the dead). Hypernaturalism is God’s use of natural mechanisms in unusual ways and involves the power of God to “manipulate nature by overcoming ridiculously small probabilities within natural law.”2 Possible biblical examples of hypernatural miracles include the parting of the Red Sea (Exodus 14:21–28) and Elijah’s calling down fire from heaven (1 Kings 18:3).

    Biochemist Fazale Rana, along with Dyke and Henry, also applied hypernaturalism to the origin of life, integrating the otherwise seemingly dichotomous concepts of intelligent design with methodological naturalism.3 As they suggest, the origin of life could have occurred through strictly natural means and yet would still qualify as a miracle.

    The concept of hypernaturalism has powerful implications throughout Christian apologetics and may be much more prevailing than most people realize. Let’s look at an example close to home—the origin of your own self.

    Consider this question: Who made you—God or your parents? According to biblical Scriptures, God created everything that has ever been made (John 1:3; Revelation 4:11)—that includes each and every one of us as unique human individuals (Psalm 139:14; Jeremiah 1:5; Matthew 10:30; Ephesians 1:4). At the same time, science can describe how meiosis, genetic recombination, gene expression, and environmental factors produce human individuals. In other words, God made you, yet you came into this world via natural mechanisms. Would not the concept of hypernaturalism apply here—especially when we consider the incredibly slim odds that natural mechanisms alone will produce you, instead of someone else?

    Hypernaturalism and You

    For the purposes of this discussion, I will focus on the genetic and chromosomal aspects of a unique human individual’s origin. It is well known that genetic recombination through sexual reproduction (meiosis and fertilization) maintains genetic diversity among populations and species.4 Meiosis is a category of cell division that involves the division of homologous chromosome pairs in a parent diploid (2n) cell to produce haploid (n) cells of gametes (ova and sperm) for the purposes of reproduction. Fertilization of gametes restores the paired condition of these homologous chromosome pairs to produce a zygote containing the genetic foundation of a unique new individual.

    There are three primary sources for maintaining genetic diversity.5

    1. Independent assortment of homologous chromosome pairs. Every human inherits one set of homologous chromosome pairs from each parent. These pairs must be lined up and separated during the first division of meiosis. Independent assortment pertains to the fact that each pair of chromosomes lines up independently of all other pairs—just as the result of one coin toss is independent of other coin tosses. Because independent assortment is considered statistically random, the number of possible outcomes of chromosomes among the gametes can be reflected by the formula 2n, where n is the haploid number (or number of pairs of homologous chromosomes). Humans have 23 pairs of homologous chromosomes; therefore each human gamete produced by an individual person represents one in 223 (or one in 8,388,608) possible outcomes, based on independent assortment alone.

    2. Random fertilization of gametes. Fertilization is also generally considered a statistically random event. If each gamete represents 2n possible outcomes, then each zygote produced at fertilization between two parents represents 2n x 2n possible outcomes. For humans, that number exceeds 70 trillion. If one couple produced 70 trillion children, two of the children might be genetically identical (aside from identical twins, which come from a single zygote). However, the odds of you being you don’t stop there.

    3. Crossing over between homologous chromosomes. Early into meiosis (prophase I), homologous pairs of chromosomes make contact and swap pieces with one another, resulting in recombinant chromosomes in the gametes that differ in genetic makeup from the chromosomes of the parent. The numbers stated above assume no crossover events. Obviously, crossing over would have the potential to drive the odds considerably higher.

    What this all means is that the odds of your parents producing you—as opposed to someone else—genetically speaking, are hundreds-of-trillions-to-one. If you think these odds seem unfathomable, consider the fact that these odds also exist for both of your parents, for each of your four grandparents, for each of your eight great-grandparents, and so on, for as far back as human history goes. The genetic basis behind your unique physical makeup certainly qualifies as overcoming ridiculously small probabilities within natural law. The odds of you being you are so incalculable that it may make the fine-tuning of the universe seem trivial by comparison. Perhaps the best example you will see of a divinely inspired and fine-tuned physical object is to look at yourself in the mirror, for each and every one of us are indeed “fearfully and wonderfully made.”


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Matthew R. McClure

    Dr. Matthew McClure received his PhD in zoology from Texas A&M University in 1994, and is currently professor of biology at Lamar State College–Orange.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Subjects: Life Design
    http://www.reasons.org/articles/what...-you-being-you

    When Jesus died on the cross he gave up His Spirit.

    Matthew 27:50
    New International Version
    And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.
    John 19:30
    English Standard Version
    When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, “It is finished,” and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.
    So this brought natural death to His Manhood. But then Jesus raised Himself from the dead by His Spirit reentering His Human body again in the grave.

    I would not attempt to explain the virgin birth. Maybe someone else has an idea.

    Grace to you
    Lou Newton

  • #2
    I love speculating about these things, Lou. Thank you for forwarding this.

    The number of cells in the adult human body is estimated to be about 37 trillion. It is mind-blowing to consider that many discrete microscopic things, each said to be more complex than the city of New York, make up one of us!

    It's also very interesting that it is roughly half of 70 trillion. And it takes two to produce a child: 70 / 2 = 35. I would count this as evidence of things not seen.

    Comment


    • #3
      What are the odds of you being you?

      From strictly a genetic viewpoint the odds are astronomical. The article in the OP made some assumptions to simplify the calculation (and I'm glad! math ain't my thing).

      From a philosophical naturalist, agnostic viewpoint, I imagine the odds are incalculable. There are so many factors that men have no basis upon which to form a hypothesis. Just a few things come to mind: which of the many quantum theories, if any, is valid; is string theory valid; are we in a universe or multiverse; outside the universe time would not exist, can we even quantify the eternal; are we just clumps of stuff that can say "I think, therefore...", or is there something more to us beyond the tangible clump?

      From a divine viewpoint, God made us with purpose. According to scripture we were already known before we were formed. So the chance of each of us being who we are is 100%. =)

      Comment


      • #4
        Virgin birth

        We know from our other studies that natural inheritance comes through the father. The father is the head of the family. In the OT we see the father giving his blessing to the son when it is time to pass on the inheritance.

        We also know that spiritual inheritance comes through the spiritual father. Abraham is the father of the children of promise, Paul calls himself the father of some of his "begotten" apostles though he had no natural children. And God is the spiritual Father of us all.

        I had also read or heard that the soul is inherited from the biological father. But I have been unable to find support in Scripture for this conjecture.

        Another point to ponder is related to these interesting verses:

        Lev 17:11a For the life of the flesh is in the blood.
        Gen 4:10 And he said, What hast thou done? the voice of thy brother's blood crieth unto me from the ground.

        Some time ago I heard a man speaking about genetic inheritance. He said something like, our biology comes equally from both parents, but the genes in the blood come only from the father. I searched online for corroboration but I came up empty. It was a very interesting claim which he linked to these two verses. (It may have been Doug Hamp. I will dig through some recordings and see if I can find it.)

        The reason I mention these verses and rights of inheritance are this. It's because of Jesus that God can be said to be "all in all". In order for Him to be all in all, He had so fulfill the roles of spiritual Father as well as biological Father. The inference is that God somehow supplied the genes for His son. I imagine He could have created the genes fully formed out of nothing. Or because He could form man from the dust, He could also have used the same natural laws for the task of forming the perfect human half of a zygote, or an entire seed.

        I am reminded of your statement, Lou, that Jesus made the man who invented the vacuum cleaner, so surely He understands the vacuum cleaner. Is there any thing too hard for Him?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Baruch View Post
          We know from our other studies that natural inheritance comes through the father. The father is the head of the family. In the OT we see the father giving his blessing to the son when it is time to pass on the inheritance.

          We also know that spiritual inheritance comes through the spiritual father. Abraham is the father of the children of promise, Paul calls himself the father of some of his "begotten" apostles though he had no natural children. And God is the spiritual Father of us all.

          I had also read or heard that the soul is inherited from the biological father. But I have been unable to find support in Scripture for this conjecture.

          Another point to ponder is related to these interesting verses:

          Lev 17:11a For the life of the flesh is in the blood.
          Gen 4:10 And he said, What hast thou done? the voice of thy brother's blood crieth unto me from the ground.

          Some time ago I heard a man speaking about genetic inheritance. He said something like, our biology comes equally from both parents, but the genes in the blood come only from the father. I searched online for corroboration but I came up empty. It was a very interesting claim which he linked to these two verses. (It may have been Doug Hamp. I will dig through some recordings and see if I can find it.)

          The reason I mention these verses and rights of inheritance are this. It's because of Jesus that God can be said to be "all in all". In order for Him to be all in all, He had so fulfill the roles of spiritual Father as well as biological Father. The inference is that God somehow supplied the genes for His son. I imagine He could have created the genes fully formed out of nothing. Or because He could form man from the dust, He could also have used the same natural laws for the task of forming the perfect human half of a zygote, or an entire seed.

          I am reminded of your statement, Lou, that Jesus made the man who invented the vacuum cleaner, so surely He understands the vacuum cleaner. Is there any thing too hard for Him?
          I enjoyed reading your comments Baruch. There is a lot to think about here.

          Just as a start, I do not see how the blood cells could be any different DNA than the rest of the body considering that the whole body comes from one cell to start. That cell keeps dividing until you have the whole body. The real miracle here is how do the cells know what kind of cell to become. From the DNA of course, but how does that take place, amazing. But the DNA just keeps unzipping and then each half acquires the rest to become the whole DNA. So I do not see how the blood cells would be different and have just the DNA from the father.

          But I am not saying that it is not possible. Something to think about.

          Thanks for the comments.

          Lou

          Comment


          • #6
            Lev 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.

            Our Lord Jesus would be the quintessential combination of the spiritual and the natural.

            We know from Rev 5:2-9 that no man was worthy to open the book and loose the seals but Jesus. And we know Jesus was worthy because He was without sin and He made atonement with His own blood.

            To accomplish this...

            Our Father, who is a spirit, made a child of flesh to be born of the womb.

            Through Mary, Jesus was the child of promise from Abraham's line. Mary having both Abraham's biology and his faith.

            Jesus had God's Spirit.

            If the soul is indeed inherited from the father, Jesus inherited His soul from the Father.

            If the blood is indeed inherited from the Father then Jesus had God's blood.

            God truly became flesh in the most human sense, and God's own blood made atonement for our souls.

            As the Father's Son, unique in so many ways, Jesus is uniquely worthy to inherit the Father's kingdom: All in all.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Baruch View Post
              Lev 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.

              Our Lord Jesus would be the quintessential combination of the spiritual and the natural.

              We know from Rev 5:2-9 that no man was worthy to open the book and loose the seals but Jesus. And we know Jesus was worthy because He was without sin and He made atonement with His own blood.

              To accomplish this...

              Our Father, who is a spirit, made a child of flesh to be born of the womb.

              Through Mary, Jesus was the child of promise from Abraham's line. Mary having both Abraham's biology and his faith.

              Jesus had God's Spirit.

              If the soul is indeed inherited from the father, Jesus inherited His soul from the Father.

              If the blood is indeed inherited from the Father then Jesus had God's blood.

              God truly became flesh in the most human sense, and God's own blood made atonement for our souls.

              As the Father's Son, unique in so many ways, Jesus is uniquely worthy to inherit the Father's kingdom: All in all.
              Good comments. God the Father was righteous, so just being righteous does not make Him worthy.

              One of the things that makes Jesus worthy is the fact that he became a man. We are to be judged by a jury of our peers. So if God never became a man, we could claim He is not worthy to judge us because he does not know what it is like to be man. But God became a man and suffered everything that we suffer and more.

              So Jesus is worthy to judge us. He is our peer and our brother.

              Lou

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post
                I enjoyed reading your comments Baruch. There is a lot to think about here.

                Just as a start, I do not see how the blood cells could be any different DNA than the rest of the body considering that the whole body comes from one cell to start. That cell keeps dividing until you have the whole body. The real miracle here is how do the cells know what kind of cell to become. From the DNA of course, but how does that take place, amazing. But the DNA just keeps unzipping and then each half acquires the rest to become the whole DNA. So I do not see how the blood cells would be different and have just the DNA from the father.

                But I am not saying that it is not possible. Something to think about.

                Thanks for the comments.

                Lou
                Hi, Lou,

                It seems to me that you are right about the blood's diploid inheritance. I found plenty of articles that explain blood type's dual inheritance, and if blood type then the whole blood may be assumed. If the blood was 50% God's, or even 0.0000001%, as long as it is good enough for God's plan A I love it.

                I'm glad you questioned this, Lou. I surely have a jumbled memory. It pushed me to try and look for it again. I did not find exactly what I was seeking, but I found this article by Doug Hamp.

                http://www.douglashamp.com/the-genet...e-incarnation/

                Doug draws some conclusions that I would not. Despite those, it is a very interesting read. But he relates a fact about inheritance that I recognized. The Y chromosome is passed down from father to son, an exact or near exact duplicate.

                Considering that God the Father supplied the Y chromosome for baby Jesus...wow.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Baruch View Post
                  Hi, Lou,

                  It seems to me that you are right about the blood's diploid inheritance. I found plenty of articles that explain blood type's dual inheritance, and if blood type then the whole blood may be assumed. If the blood was 50% God's, or even 0.0000001%, as long as it is good enough for God's plan A I love it.

                  I'm glad you questioned this, Lou. I surely have a jumbled memory. It pushed me to try and look for it again. I did not find exactly what I was seeking, but I found this article by Doug Hamp.

                  http://www.douglashamp.com/the-genet...e-incarnation/

                  Doug draws some conclusions that I would not. Despite those, it is a very interesting read. But he relates a fact about inheritance that I recognized. The Y chromosome is passed down from father to son, an exact or near exact duplicate.

                  Considering that God the Father supplied the Y chromosome for baby Jesus...wow.
                  Thanks for the article Baruch.................................Lou

                  Comment

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