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  • Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky spoke Russian

    What is your Mother Tongue?
    Mine is English and the only language I know.
    Many people in America who speak English do not have English as their Mother Tongue. Mother tongue is the first language someone learns or the predominant language of childhood. The Mother Tongue speaks to the heart deeper than English to those who know English as a second language.
    Thus the purpose of this thread.

    Do you know anyone whose Mother Tongue is other than English?
    There are over 7,000 languages spoken by humans on earth and over 6,000 are distinct languages. There are about 300 languages spoken by at least million people or more. Bibles, Bible portions, Christian books, music, booklets and tracts are available in hundreds of languages. Tracts are available in over a thousand languages. After the “Top Ten” (below) are some resources for getting these materials to your friends and acquaintances and maybe even strangers you have contact with who do not speak English or know English as a second language.

    Top ten non English languages spoken in the U.S. from < to >:

    10. Portuguese
    Nearly doubling (95 percent) since 1980, approximately 673,566 Portuguese speakers can be found in the US, most notably in New York, Providence, Boston and Miami.

    9. Italian
    Representing the largest decline on this list, Italian claims only 723,632 speakers – half as many as in 1980. Italian can still be heard in places like New York, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia.

    8. Russian
    Almost as big a boost as Vietnamese, the 905,843 Russian-speakers in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco, among other cities, have increased by 391 percent.

    7. Korean
    1,141,277 speakers of Korean, located mainly in Los Angeles, New York, Washington DC and Chicago, have quadrupled over the last thirty years.

    6. German
    Found primarily in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington DC, German-speakers number 1,083,637, which is actually a 30 percent decrease in speakers since 1980.

    5. Vietnamese
    With an increase of 510 percent since 1980, Vietnamese is the language with the biggest change, with 1,419,539speakers found in Los Angeles, San Jose, Houston and Dallas, among other cities.

    4. French
    The 1,301,443 French-speakers found primarily in New York, Washington DC, Boston and Miami represent a 28 percent increase compared to 1980.

    3. Tagalog
    This language from the Phillipines boasts 1,594,413 speakers in the US – slightly more than tripling its numbers in the last three decades, and recently surpassing French on this list. Speakers of Tagalog are concentrated mainly in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York and San Diego.

    2. Chinese
    Just about 2,882,497 people speak a Chinese dialect such as Mandarin or Cantonese, an increase of 290 percent! You’re most likely to find Chinese dialect-speakers in New York, Los Angeles or San Francisco.

    1. Spanish
    With 37,579,787 speakers, the number of Spanish-speakers in the US has increased by 210 percent since 1980, with the highest concentrations in Los Angeles, New York, Miami and Chicago.
    http://www.alsintl.com/blog/top-10-languages/

    This is a list of several sources:
    http://www.missionresources.com/placesbible.html

    This is my favorite. I ordered Portuguese and Czech Bibles from them:
    http://www.multilanguage.com/

    Check Amazon for different Bibles and you might save some money.

    This is a list of the predominant language/s spoken by country:
    http://www.wmpress.org/whatlanguageupdated.pdf

    The above is from:
    http://www.wmpress.org/index.shtml

    For ever, O Lord, thy word is settled in heaven.
    Psalms 119:89

  • #2
    Originally posted by baobab View Post
    What is your Mother Tongue?
    Mine is English and the only language I know.
    Many people in America who speak English do not have English as their Mother Tongue. Mother tongue is the first language someone learns or the predominant language of childhood. The Mother Tongue speaks to the heart deeper than English to those who know English as a second language.
    Thus the purpose of this thread.

    Do you know anyone whose Mother Tongue is other than English?
    There are over 7,000 languages spoken by humans on earth and over 6,000 are distinct languages. There are about 300 languages spoken by at least million people or more. Bibles, Bible portions, Christian books, music, booklets and tracts are available in hundreds of languages. Tracts are available in over a thousand languages. After the “Top Ten” (below) are some resources for getting these materials to your friends and acquaintances and maybe even strangers you have contact with who do not speak English or know English as a second language.

    Top ten non English languages spoken in the U.S. from < to >:

    10. Portuguese
    Nearly doubling (95 percent) since 1980, approximately 673,566 Portuguese speakers can be found in the US, most notably in New York, Providence, Boston and Miami.

    9. Italian
    Representing the largest decline on this list, Italian claims only 723,632 speakers – half as many as in 1980. Italian can still be heard in places like New York, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia.

    8. Russian
    Almost as big a boost as Vietnamese, the 905,843 Russian-speakers in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco, among other cities, have increased by 391 percent.

    7. Korean
    1,141,277 speakers of Korean, located mainly in Los Angeles, New York, Washington DC and Chicago, have quadrupled over the last thirty years.

    6. German
    Found primarily in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington DC, German-speakers number 1,083,637, which is actually a 30 percent decrease in speakers since 1980.

    5. Vietnamese
    With an increase of 510 percent since 1980, Vietnamese is the language with the biggest change, with 1,419,539speakers found in Los Angeles, San Jose, Houston and Dallas, among other cities.

    4. French
    The 1,301,443 French-speakers found primarily in New York, Washington DC, Boston and Miami represent a 28 percent increase compared to 1980.

    3. Tagalog
    This language from the Phillipines boasts 1,594,413 speakers in the US – slightly more than tripling its numbers in the last three decades, and recently surpassing French on this list. Speakers of Tagalog are concentrated mainly in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York and San Diego.

    2. Chinese
    Just about 2,882,497 people speak a Chinese dialect such as Mandarin or Cantonese, an increase of 290 percent! You’re most likely to find Chinese dialect-speakers in New York, Los Angeles or San Francisco.

    1. Spanish
    With 37,579,787 speakers, the number of Spanish-speakers in the US has increased by 210 percent since 1980, with the highest concentrations in Los Angeles, New York, Miami and Chicago.
    http://www.alsintl.com/blog/top-10-languages/

    This is a list of several sources:
    http://www.missionresources.com/placesbible.html

    This is my favorite. I ordered Portuguese and Czech Bibles from them:
    http://www.multilanguage.com/

    Check Amazon for different Bibles and you might save some money.

    This is a list of the predominant language/s spoken by country:
    http://www.wmpress.org/whatlanguageupdated.pdf

    The above is from:
    http://www.wmpress.org/index.shtml

    For ever, O Lord, thy word is settled in heaven.
    Psalms 119:89
    Hi Denny,
    English is my mother tongue but I can call Spanish my second language. My Spanish gets rusty when I don't use it often.
    I can read and write Hebrew but I forgot all my words and phrases and conjugation of verbs. If I move to Israel I would be fluent in less than 6 months.
    I am blessed to be able to count to 10 in English, Spanish, Greek, Hebrew, French, and German.
    Not that it would make a difference in my life but language seems to come easy to me.
    Blessings. .... Steve

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
      Hi Denny,
      English is my mother tongue but I can call Spanish my second language. My Spanish gets rusty when I don't use it often.
      I can read and write Hebrew but I forgot all my words and phrases and conjugation of verbs. If I move to Israel I would be fluent in less than 6 months.
      I am blessed to be able to count to 10 in English, Spanish, Greek, Hebrew, French, and German.
      Not that it would make a difference in my life but language seems to come easy to me.
      Blessings. .... Steve
      Thanks Barry and Steve.

      WOW Steve that is impressive. Language is hard for me, math, science and history are easy for me.

      I taught myself physics and calculus but I took two years of French in High School and I can not speak or understand it at all. After two years of it I can only remember a few words, "pomme de terre " which means "apple of the earth" or potato ; and "le crayon" which means pencil.

      Lou

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post
        Thanks Barry and Steve.

        WOW Steve that is impressive. Language is hard for me, math, science and history are easy for me.

        I taught myself physics and calculus but I took two years of French in High School and I can not speak or understand it at all. After two years of it I can only remember a few words, "pomme de terre " which means "apple of the earth" or potato ; and "le crayon" which means pencil.

        Lou
        Hi Lou,
        So we finally found something that you don't excell in. Don't fret, you're off the charts with most everything else. ..... Steve

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
          Hi Lou,
          So we finally found something that you don't excell in. Don't fret, you're off the charts with most everything else. ..... Steve
          Thanks Steve, but there are plenty more things that I am very poor at where that came from..............Lou

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post
            Thanks Steve, but there are plenty more things that I am very poor at where that came from..............Lou
            No problem pal but I bet you could count your deficiencies on one hand and you can't even count all of the blessings you do have............. Steve

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you for these resources, Baobab. I truly hope they come in handy!

              Comment


              • #8
                I really should learn Spanish. I've had quite a few years of it in school, but languages aren't so much my thing.

                Thanks for the links.

                Comment

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