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Novice Taya Kyle Beats Champion Bruce Piatt in Sniper Shootout

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  • Novice Taya Kyle Beats Champion Bruce Piatt in Sniper Shootout

    Taya is American Sniper Chris Kyle's widow. She is a novice shooter and she competed against Champion shooter Bruce Piatt. She hits100% of her shots while Piatt hit an amazing 58% of his shots. She scored over 10,000 points against his over 3000. He missed many of the almost impossible shots that she made.

    How did she do this ? She used TrackingPoint’s new auto-locking squad-level precision-fire M600, M800, and XS1 precision-guide firearms. These three firearms cost about $54,000 total as far as I could find out. She actually shot around corners while putting her rifle around the corner and keeping herself hidden behind objects.

    She fired at moving targets and at unknown distances up to 1000 yards without missing one shot. These are simply amazing rifles with amazing scopes.



    http://blog.cheaperthandirt.com/novice-taya-kyle-beats-champion-bruce-piatt-sniper-shootout/comment-page-1/#comment-308084


    You can see the rifles here:


    http://tracking-point.com/

    The 5.56x45 costs $9,995

    The 7.62 rifle cost $15,995

    The 338 Lapua costs $27,500

  • #2
    How did she afford those guns?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Steve Hollander View Post
      How did she afford those guns?

      The guns were supplied to her by the maker to show how even a novice shooter could beat a Champion shooter while using them.

      She did not miss even one shot with them.

      If you want to get me something for Christmas, get me the 338 Lapua bolt action. You may have to save up a while though. They cost $27,500 with the special TrackingPoint scope. I will not wait by the door for the delivery truck.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post


        The guns were supplied to her by the maker to show how even a novice shooter could beat a Champion shooter while using them.

        She did not miss even one shot with them.

        If you want to get me something for Christmas, get me the 338 Lapua bolt action. You may have to save up a while though. They cost $27,500 with the special TrackingPoint scope. I will not wait by the door for the delivery truck.
        I wonder if I could get a deal on two?

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        • #5
          Wow, amazing tech. It seems it doesn't even require a human. Any waldo can point a thing "that-a-way".

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Baruch View Post
            Wow, amazing tech. It seems it doesn't even require a human. Any waldo can point a thing "that-a-way".

            A human still has to put the cross hairs on the target, decide if the target is valid, and decide if they should pull the trigger. The system calculates the wind, target speed and distance, coriolis effect, and fires when the cross hairs are on the target that was picked by the human.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post


              A human still has to put the cross hairs on the target, decide if the target is valid, and decide if they should pull the trigger. The system calculates the wind, target speed and distance, coriolis effect, and fires when the cross hairs are on the target that was picked by the human.
              To use this weapon, yes. I meant the targeting system. Seems ideal for drone use. Drone decisions are on the verge of being taken out of human hands and put under the control of AI. But even before that transition takes place, this targeting system seems a game changer for UAVs as well as human soldiers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Baruch View Post

                To use this weapon, yes. I meant the targeting system. Seems ideal for drone use. Drone decisions are on the verge of being taken out of human hands and put under the control of AI. But even before that transition takes place, this targeting system seems a game changer for UAVs as well as human soldiers.

                Sorry I misunderstood you Barry. But yes, this sure changes the situation and gives the ability to way more men to be able to hit targets at long range. That used to take a very highly trained man to do that. Not only that but we see this novice woman hit 100% while the Champion shooter only hit 58% of his targets.

                Most shooters do not even know the coriolis effect exists, let alone understand it, or far more, be able to calculate what the correction for that effect should be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lou Newton View Post


                  Sorry I misunderstood you Barry. But yes, this sure changes the situation and gives the ability to way more men to be able to hit targets at long range. That used to take a very highly trained man to do that. Not only that but we see this novice woman hit 100% while the Champion shooter only hit 58% of his targets.

                  Most shooters do not even know the coriolis effect exists, let alone understand it, or far more, be able to calculate what the correction for that effect should be.
                  No apology necessary! Wow, the coriolis effects windage? (I thought it was just for bathtubs.) I learned something new. Thanks for posting this very interesting article, Lou.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Baruch View Post

                    No apology necessary! Wow, the coriolis effects windage? (I thought it was just for bathtubs.) I learned something new. Thanks for posting this very interesting article, Lou.

                    The coriolis effect ( which is named after a Frenchmen named Coriolis who wrote paper about it in the 1800's) has little effect on short range shots and can be neglected. But if a person is trying to hit a small target at 1200 yards, then he will miss it if he does not consider it.

                    All one has to remember is this; in the Northern Hemisphere the bullet will go to your right of where you are aiming. A 308 bullet might go 3" to the right at 1000 yards here in Ohio. It makes no difference of the direction you are shooting. The bullet will always go to the right of the direction you are shooting. So if you are shooting north, the bullet will go to your right (or east). If you are shooting South, the bullet will go your right (or west). The further north you are the greater the effect. It has no effect at the Equator.

                    In the Southern Hemisphere the bullet will always be deflected to the left of the point of aim.

                    But there is also an Eotvos Effect on bullets too. This is caused by the centrifugal force that the rotation of the earth causes. This effects the elevation of the shot. If you shoot east, or in the same direction the earth rotates in, the bullet will be pushed up by the force. If you shoot west, in the opposite direction of the earth's rotation, the bullet will drop more than expected by gravity alone. Therefore bullets fired east fly a little higher than expected and bullets fired west fly a little lower than expected.

                    Of course wind has an even greater effect and is difficult to predict because the wind speed might be more or less at the target than where the shooter is. You could have no wind at the shooters site and target site, but have wind in between the two.

                    Gravity is the biggest factor, but it is predictable as long as you know the distance of the target from you. At long distance this factor may be in feet instead of inches.

                    Anyone really interested in long range shooting can learn a lot from this site:



                    The first thing you will see in this video is this:

                    Psalm 144 Blessed be the Lord my strength which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight:

                    He is very good at what he does.
                    Last edited by Lou Newton; December 22, 2015, 10:20 AM.

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