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  • Jerome increase case, the man behind the company


    Everyone who is of the Truth hears My voice.
    John 18:37

    There is a crown of life waiting for all of those who have loved His Appearing.
    II Tim 4:8

    Love is never glad about injustice,
    But always rejoices whenever Truth and Right prevail.
    I Corin 13:6



    Jerome Increase Case was born in December of 1819 into the family of successful farmers. By the time he was 23, his family up-bringing had encouraged him to pursue his personal desires and to be self supportive. Although his interests were agricultural, young Jerome had a fascination with the mechanization that had been slowly easing the burden of tedious labor. His immediate focus was on the newly developed groundhog threshing machine that could do more in an hour than a man could in a day. But almost immediately young Case could see a need for improvement. While the new machine was adequate in physically separating the grain from the head, retrieving a clean grain sample still required time consuming labor. Jerome believed that this final process could be mechanized as well. After examining many of the groundhog threshers available at the time, he selected the best model, left his home in New York and headed to the western frontier, where large acreages were quickly coming under the plow. There he put his thresher to use, hiring out his services to many area farmers. His attention to detail and quest for excellence was obvious and his service business thrived. But during the winter Jerome did not rest. Working all hours in an unused church building that he had converted to a shop, he drew upon the knowledge that he had gained prior and set about developing the improved separator that he desired. Through much trial and error (and failure), he finally came up with shaking screen coupled with a fan that accomplished his objective. It operated on an eccentric crank that took the rotary motion of a pulley and converted it into a lateral back and forth shaking to deliver a pure grain sample. (Remarkably, Case's development, with only minor improvements, is still used in today's modern harvesters) The following summer he again returned to the fields where his machine (with further refinement and modification) was heartily embraced by farmers for its efficiency. It soon became apparent that his future would lie in manufacturing and in 1844 the J.I.Case Company began.

    The main object of my article however, is not the innovative and intellectual genius of Jerome Case, even though these are surely Godly characteristics. But the Scriptures tell us that irregardless of the array of spiritual, mental or physical gifts that we have been given, they are all completely worthless and of no account whatsoever,(in fact worse than an incessant clanging cymbal).. UNLESS they have been thoroughly combined with love, concern and respect of our fellow man. In our fallen world, those with intellect, wealth and power use these gifts endowed to them to enslave and control, or just ignore those that have been given less; just to greedily enrich their abundance. It is however, within this prevailing darkness, that a single candle may be lit and its flickering flame illuminate the Presence of Jesus. At His Appearing the poor and suffering will rejoice and sing His Praises and perhaps be encouraged enough to emulate Him. It is with this pleasure in mind that I will share the next chapter of Jerome Increase Case.

    Case's innovation and continued quest for excellence, propelled his company to market dominance by the 1880's. They had sold thousands of threshers and were renowned for their quality. But not all of them. As often is the case, despite painstaking care and quality assurance, inevitably a machine is produced and sold that refuses to comply with company standards. Such a thresher was sold to a farmer in Faribault, Minnesota in 1884.

    The farmer had recently purchased the machine in anticipation of the coming harvest and with much eagerness looked forward to put it into use. He had contracted with several of his neighbors that he would be able to do their barley and wheat and had promised a timely and high quality job of threshing with the new machine. However, as he began in his own field to obtain proper adjustment and operating procedure, something was definitely amiss. The new thresher required abnormal amounts of power to operate and as the crop was fed in, adequate operating speed could not be maintained. As a result, the grain sample was filled with chaff and the chaff contained way too much grain. Stubbornly, the farmer fought with adjustments and lubrication. He was outside and inside the cursed machine as the blazing July sun coaxed his oozing perspiration through his clothing. His resultant harvest from the first day amounted only to the dirt and chaff clinging to his sweaty body and his frustration clinging to everything else. NOW was the time to call on the manufacturer!

    Case Threshing Machine Co had dealt with dissatisfied farmers previously and understood their very livelihood was submitted to a timely harvest. They also knew that generally an inexperienced operator was to blame, and with a little bit of training and adjustment all would be well. Case immediately dispatched one of his most trusted field mechanics to Faribault to remedy the situation. Despite the presence of the trained technician, the thresher still refused to comply to normalcy. It continued to consume great power but produced piles of trash. With the second day's setting sun, harvest yield exactly doubled that of the first day in terms of blood, sweat, profanity, and an ugly barley pile.

    The poor mechanic reported back to company headquarters and had to humbly relay the tale of his defeat to Mr. Case. Jerome Increase Case, the designer, the founder, the owner, the president and CEO, nodded and said simply, "Then I will go to fix that machine." He took the first train out of Racine, Wisconsin and headed for Faribault.

    On the morning of the third day, Case arrived at the farm to see his threshing machine in the field, with its J.I.Case corporate nameplate glistening in the sun. Around the thresher however was reminiscent of a battlefield. Tools, spare parts, piles of chaff and grain were strewn about in disarray. He viewed the debacle but had come dressed for work and prepared with resolve to make HIS machine work properly. He delved into it, inside and out, rechecking and redoing the work of those before him; investigating new possibilities, and replacing suspected defects. But as the sun was lowering in the western sky, the machine still refused to run freely, and stubbornly continued to produce piles of worthless trash. The distraught farmer, with anger underlying and hopelessness flooding over anxiety, looked toward the perplexed manufacturer. With his strong back hunched and his broad shoulders sagging, he stared up into Jerome's eyes to find the tiniest glimmer of hope. The ground beneath his feet was slipping away, and he desperately needed an expression, a word, something to cling to. J.I. Case had to respond and could not look away from the man's crushed countenance. "I have one more idea," he said, "Go get me a large bucket of kerosene, and I think that I can repair this accursed thresher." The farmer with bewilderment, nevertheless obliged, and soon returned with the ingredient. Jerome Case then took the buckets from the farmer's hands and proceeded to douse the machine..top, sides, and especially inside. "This wretched machine shall no longer torment you,..nor I,.. nor any other living soul!!" With a great flourish sparked with frustration, Jerome lit a match from his pipe and tossed a flame into the thresher's innermost region, where fire soon enveloped the machine, brightening the dusk sky with the inferno. It illuminated the men's faces in the raging light, revealing the stress receding and gradual satisfied smiles spreading. J.I. Case put his arm around the farmer's neck and in a low voice said, "Tomorrow there will be a new thresher in your barnyard, delivered by my best mechanic that shall operate as your good money and my good nameplate should indicate." Softer yet he spoke," I apologize deeply for all the problems that this has caused you." Both men lingered, side by side, shoulder to shoulder, watching together as the fire reduced the machine to ash.

    The story about the fulfillment of Case's unwritten nameplate warranty spread quickly through the farmlands of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and with the passage of time, much further. J.I.Case Co. continued to grow, and eventually expanded from threshing machines alone, into producing tractors and a complete line of farm machinery and construction equipment. They remained a dominant player in the market through the 20th and into the 21st century, bringing many new innovations to agriculture. They were purchased by the corporate giant Tenneco in 1970, and later merged with International Harvester to form today's powerful Case IH Corporation.

    You are the light of the world.
    A city set upon a hill that cannot be hidden.
    Let your light shine before men,
    That they may see your good works
    And thereby glorify your Father in heaven.
    Math 5:14,16

    Give and it will be given back to you;
    In heavy measure, pressed down, shaken together, and overflowing,
    Will be put into your bosom.
    Luke 6:38




    Last edited by RoyDavid; July 24th, 2017, 10:51 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by RoyDavid View Post
    Everyone who is of the Truth hears My voice.

    John 18:37




    There is a crown of life waiting for all of those who have loved His Appearing.

    II Tim 4:8




    Love is never glad about injustice,

    But always rejoices whenever Truth and Right prevail.

    I Corin 13:6



    Jerome Increase Case was born in December of 1819 into the family of successful farmers. By the time he was 23, his family up-bringing had encouraged him to pursue his personal desires and to be self supportive. Although his interests were agricultural, young Jerome had a fascination with the mechanization that had been slowly easing the burden of tedious labor. His immediate focus was on the newly developed groundhog threshing machine that could do more in an hour than a man could in a day. But almost immediately young Case could see a need for improvement. While the new machine was adequate in physically separating the grain from the head, retrieving a clean grain sample still required time consuming labor. Jerome believed that this final process could be mechanized as well. After examining many of the groundhog threshers available at the time, he selected the best model, left his home in New York and headed to the western frontier, where large acreages were quickly coming under the plow. There he put his thresher to use, hiring out his services to many area farmers. His attention to detail and quest for excellence was obvious and his service business thrived. But during the winter Jerome did not rest. Working all hours in an unused church building that he had converted to a shop, he drew upon the knowledge that he had gained prior and set about developing the improved separator that he desired. Through much trial and error (and failure), he finally came up with shaking screen coupled with a fan that accomplished his objective. It operated on an eccentric crank that took the rotary motion of a pulley and converted it into a lateral back and forth shaking to deliver a pure grain sample. (Remarkably, Case's development, with only minor improvements, is still used in today's modern harvesters) The following summer he again returned to the fields where his machine (with further refinement and modification) was heartily embraced by farmers for its efficiency. It soon became apparent that his future would lie in manufacturing and in 1844 the J.I.Case Company began.

    The main object of my article however, is not the innovative and intellectual genius of Jerome Case, even though these are surely Godly characteristics. But the Scriptures tell us that irregardless of the array of spiritual, mental or physical gifts that we have been given, they are all completely worthless and of no account whatsoever,(in fact worse than an incessant clanging cymbal).. UNLESS they have been thoroughly combined with love, concern and respect of our fellow man. In our fallen world, those with intellect, wealth and power use these gifts endowed to them to enslave and control, or just ignore those that have been given less; just to greedily enrich their abundance. It is however, within this prevailing darkness, that a single candle may be lit and its flickering flame illuminate the Presence of Jesus. At His Appearing the poor and suffering will rejoice and sing His Praises and perhaps be encouraged enough to emulate Him. It is with this pleasure in mind that I will share the next chapter of Jerome Increase Case.

    Case's innovation and continued quest for excellence, propelled his company to market dominance by the 1880's. They had sold thousands of threshers and were renowned for their quality. But not all of them. As often is the case, despite painstaking care and quality assurance, inevitably a machine is produced and sold that refuses to comply with company standards. Such a thresher was sold to a farmer in Faribault, Minnesota in 1884.

    The farmer had recently purchased the machine in anticipation of the coming harvest and with much eagerness looked forward to put it into use. He had contracted with several of his neighbors that he would be able to do their barley and wheat and had promised a timely and high quality job of threshing with the new machine. However, as he began in his own field to obtain proper adjustment and operating procedure, something was definitely amiss. The new thresher required abnormal amounts of power to operate and as the crop was fed in, adequate operating speed could not be maintained. As a result, the grain sample was filled with chaff and the chaff contained way too much grain. Stubbornly, the farmer fought with adjustments and lubrication. He was outside and inside the cursed machine as the blazing July sun coaxed his oozing perspiration through his clothing. His resultant harvest from the first day amounted only to the dirt and chaff clinging to his sweaty body and his frustration clinging to everything else. NOW was the time to call on the manufacturer!

    Case Threshing Machine Co had dealt with dissatisfied farmers previously and understood their very livelihood was submitted to a timely harvest. They also knew that generally an inexperienced operator was to blame, and with a little bit of training and adjustment all would be well. Case immediately dispatched one of his most trusted field mechanics to Faribault to remedy the situation. Despite the presence of the trained technician, the thresher still refused to comply to normalcy. It continued to consume great power but produced piles of trash. With the second day's setting sun, harvest yield exactly doubled that of the first day in terms of blood, sweat, profanity, and an ugly barley pile.

    The poor mechanic reported back to company headquarters and had to humbly relay the tale of his defeat to Mr. Case. Jerome Increase Case, the designer, the founder, the owner, the president and CEO, nodded and said simply, "Then I will go to fix that machine." He took the first train out of Racine, Wisconsin and headed for Faribault.

    On the morning of the third day, Case arrived at the farm to see his threshing machine in the field, with its J.I.Case corporate nameplate glistening in the sun. Around the thresher however was reminiscent of a battlefield. Tools, spare parts, piles of chaff and grain were strewn about in disarray. He viewed the debacle but had come dressed for work and prepared with resolve to make HIS machine work properly. He delved into it, inside and out, rechecking and redoing the work of those before him; investigating new possibilities, and replacing suspected defects. But as the sun was lowering in the western sky, the machine still refused to run freely, and stubbornly continued to produce piles of worthless trash. The distraught farmer, with anger underlying and hopelessness flooding over anxiety, looked toward the perplexed manufacturer. With his strong back hunched and his broad shoulders sagging, he stared up into Jerome's eyes to find the tiniest glimmer of hope. The ground beneath his feet was slipping away, and he desperately needed an expression, a word, something to cling to. J.I. Case had to respond and could not look away from the man's crushed countenance. "I have one more idea," he said, "Go get me a large bucket of kerosene, and I think that I can repair this accursed thresher." The farmer with bewilderment, nevertheless obliged, and soon returned with the ingredient. Jerome Case then took the buckets from the farmer's hands and proceeded to douse the machine..top, sides, and especially inside. "This wretched machine shall no longer torment you,..nor I,.. nor any other living soul!!" With a great flourish sparked with frustration, Jerome lit a match from his pipe and tossed a flame into the thresher's innermost region, where fire soon enveloped the machine, brightening the dusk sky with the inferno. It illuminated the men's faces in the raging light, revealing the stress receding and gradual satisfied smiles spreading. J.I. Case put his arm around the farmer's neck and in a low voice said, "Tomorrow there will be a new thresher in your barnyard, delivered by my best mechanic that shall operate as your good money and my good nameplate should indicate." Softer yet he spoke," I apologize deeply for all the problems that this has caused you." Both men lingered, side by side, shoulder to shoulder, watching together as the fire reduced the machine to ash.

    The story about the fulfillment of Case's unwritten nameplate warranty spread quickly through the farmlands of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and with the passage of time, much further. J.I.Case Co. continued to grow, and eventually expanded from threshing machines alone, into producing tractors and a complete line of farm machinery and construction equipment. They remained a dominant player in the market through the 20th and into the 21st century, bringing many new innovations to agriculture. They were purchased by the corporate giant Tenneco in 1970, and later merged with International Harvester to form today's powerful Case IH Corporation.

    You are the light of the world.
    A city set upon a hill that cannot be hidden.
    Let your light shine before men,
    That they may see your good works
    And thereby glorify your Father in heaven.
    Math 5:14,16

    Give and it will be given back to you;
    In heavy measure, pressed down, shaken together, and overflowing,
    Will be put into your bosom.
    Luke 6:38
    FANTASTIC Roy. What a truly wonderful story. This is like a cool drink of water in the desert we call the US.

    Thank you so very much for writing and posting this. We look forward to more like this.

    Your friend,
    Lou

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by RoyDavid View Post
      Everyone who is of the Truth hears My voice.
      John 18:37

      There is a crown of life waiting for all of those who have loved His Appearing.
      II Tim 4:8

      Love is never glad about injustice,
      But always rejoices whenever Truth and Right prevail.
      I Corin 13:6



      Jerome Increase Case was born in December of 1819 into the family of successful farmers. By the time he was 23, his family up-bringing had encouraged him to pursue his personal desires and to be self supportive. Although his interests were agricultural, young Jerome had a fascination with the mechanization that had been slowly easing the burden of tedious labor. His immediate focus was on the newly developed groundhog threshing machine that could do more in an hour than a man could in a day. But almost immediately young Case could see a need for improvement. While the new machine was adequate in physically separating the grain from the head, retrieving a clean grain sample still required time consuming labor. Jerome believed that this final process could be mechanized as well. After examining many of the groundhog threshers available at the time, he selected the best model, left his home in New York and headed to the western frontier, where large acreages were quickly coming under the plow. There he put his thresher to use, hiring out his services to many area farmers. His attention to detail and quest for excellence was obvious and his service business thrived. But during the winter Jerome did not rest. Working all hours in an unused church building that he had converted to a shop, he drew upon the knowledge that he had gained prior and set about developing the improved separator that he desired. Through much trial and error (and failure), he finally came up with shaking screen coupled with a fan that accomplished his objective. It operated on an eccentric crank that took the rotary motion of a pulley and converted it into a lateral back and forth shaking to deliver a pure grain sample. (Remarkably, Case's development, with only minor improvements, is still used in today's modern harvesters) The following summer he again returned to the fields where his machine (with further refinement and modification) was heartily embraced by farmers for its efficiency. It soon became apparent that his future would lie in manufacturing and in 1844 the J.I.Case Company began.

      The main object of my article however, is not the innovative and intellectual genius of Jerome Case, even though these are surely Godly characteristics. But the Scriptures tell us that irregardless of the array of spiritual, mental or physical gifts that we have been given, they are all completely worthless and of no account whatsoever,(in fact worse than an incessant clanging cymbal).. UNLESS they have been thoroughly combined with love, concern and respect of our fellow man. In our fallen world, those with intellect, wealth and power use these gifts endowed to them to enslave and control, or just ignore those that have been given less; just to greedily enrich their abundance. It is however, within this prevailing darkness, that a single candle may be lit and its flickering flame illuminate the Presence of Jesus. At His Appearing the poor and suffering will rejoice and sing His Praises and perhaps be encouraged enough to emulate Him. It is with this pleasure in mind that I will share the next chapter of Jerome Increase Case.

      Case's innovation and continued quest for excellence, propelled his company to market dominance by the 1880's. They had sold thousands of threshers and were renowned for their quality. But not all of them. As often is the case, despite painstaking care and quality assurance, inevitably a machine is produced and sold that refuses to comply with company standards. Such a thresher was sold to a farmer in Faribault, Minnesota in 1884.

      The farmer had recently purchased the machine in anticipation of the coming harvest and with much eagerness looked forward to put it into use. He had contracted with several of his neighbors that he would be able to do their barley and wheat and had promised a timely and high quality job of threshing with the new machine. However, as he began in his own field to obtain proper adjustment and operating procedure, something was definitely amiss. The new thresher required abnormal amounts of power to operate and as the crop was fed in, adequate operating speed could not be maintained. As a result, the grain sample was filled with chaff and the chaff contained way too much grain. Stubbornly, the farmer fought with adjustments and lubrication. He was outside and inside the cursed machine as the blazing July sun coaxed his oozing perspiration through his clothing. His resultant harvest from the first day amounted only to the dirt and chaff clinging to his sweaty body and his frustration clinging to everything else. NOW was the time to call on the manufacturer!

      Case Threshing Machine Co had dealt with dissatisfied farmers previously and understood their very livelihood was submitted to a timely harvest. They also knew that generally an inexperienced operator was to blame, and with a little bit of training and adjustment all would be well. Case immediately dispatched one of his most trusted field mechanics to Faribault to remedy the situation. Despite the presence of the trained technician, the thresher still refused to comply to normalcy. It continued to consume great power but produced piles of trash. With the second day's setting sun, harvest yield exactly doubled that of the first day in terms of blood, sweat, profanity, and an ugly barley pile.

      The poor mechanic reported back to company headquarters and had to humbly relay the tale of his defeat to Mr. Case. Jerome Increase Case, the designer, the founder, the owner, the president and CEO, nodded and said simply, "Then I will go to fix that machine." He took the first train out of Racine, Wisconsin and headed for Faribault.

      On the morning of the third day, Case arrived at the farm to see his threshing machine in the field, with its J.I.Case corporate nameplate glistening in the sun. Around the thresher however was reminiscent of a battlefield. Tools, spare parts, piles of chaff and grain were strewn about in disarray. He viewed the debacle but had come dressed for work and prepared with resolve to make HIS machine work properly. He delved into it, inside and out, rechecking and redoing the work of those before him; investigating new possibilities, and replacing suspected defects. But as the sun was lowering in the western sky, the machine still refused to run freely, and stubbornly continued to produce piles of worthless trash. The distraught farmer, with anger underlying and hopelessness flooding over anxiety, looked toward the perplexed manufacturer. With his strong back hunched and his broad shoulders sagging, he stared up into Jerome's eyes to find the tiniest glimmer of hope. The ground beneath his feet was slipping away, and he desperately needed an expression, a word, something to cling to. J.I. Case had to respond and could not look away from the man's crushed countenance. "I have one more idea," he said, "Go get me a large bucket of kerosene, and I think that I can repair this accursed thresher." The farmer with bewilderment, nevertheless obliged, and soon returned with the ingredient. Jerome Case then took the buckets from the farmer's hands and proceeded to douse the machine..top, sides, and especially inside. "This wretched machine shall no longer torment you,..nor I,.. nor any other living soul!!" With a great flourish sparked with frustration, Jerome lit a match from his pipe and tossed a flame into the thresher's innermost region, where fire soon enveloped the machine, brightening the dusk sky with the inferno. It illuminated the men's faces in the raging light, revealing the stress receding and gradual satisfied smiles spreading. J.I. Case put his arm around the farmer's neck and in a low voice said, "Tomorrow there will be a new thresher in your barnyard, delivered by my best mechanic that shall operate as your good money and my good nameplate should indicate." Softer yet he spoke," I apologize deeply for all the problems that this has caused you." Both men lingered, side by side, shoulder to shoulder, watching together as the fire reduced the machine to ash.

      The story about the fulfillment of Case's unwritten nameplate warranty spread quickly through the farmlands of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and with the passage of time, much further. J.I.Case Co. continued to grow, and eventually expanded from threshing machines alone, into producing tractors and a complete line of farm machinery and construction equipment. They remained a dominant player in the market through the 20th and into the 21st century, bringing many new innovations to agriculture. They were purchased by the corporate giant Tenneco in 1970, and later merged with International Harvester to form today's powerful Case IH Corporation.

      You are the light of the world.
      A city set upon a hill that cannot be hidden.
      Let your light shine before men,
      That they may see your good works
      And thereby glorify your Father in heaven.
      Math 5:14,16

      Give and it will be given back to you;
      In heavy measure, pressed down, shaken together, and overflowing,
      Will be put into your bosom.
      Luke 6:38
      -------------------------------------------
      Welcome Roy David.

      This story about Case. It is a story of geography.
      If you observed a world map indicating types of geography there is a dominate fact.
      The mid west of the USA and southern Canada contains the largest and most concentrated patch of arable farmland in the world.
      It is the world's bread basket.
      In the old world, farm land was generally small acreage - acreage farmed by a family.
      Only where there was farming on an enormous scale could the demand for the harvester combine be economical feasible.
      Case enters as a solution of genius, but also of divine providence.

      And . . . and who is it that farms these bread basket lands? Protestant Christians.
      What is the results?

      Protestant farmers giving to their churches who in turn fund missions around the world.

      With the eyes of angels, believers may see the workings of the spiritual world.

      Thank you for the story of Jerome Increase Case.
      I wonder if he ever knew the role he played in the Lord's plan of redemption?


      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with Lou, Roy: a wonderful tale. Glen, another superb comment. Thanks, gentlemen.

        Kerosene. Wow. That's rich. I'm still chuckling.

        Comment

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